bottle jack to raise dormer/room


I have a second floor dormer/room that had dropped a few inches on one end (before I bought the property) due to a poor support design. I now have it supported from underneath and I want to try jacking it up a little at a time using a 20-ton bottle jack on each of the two exterior corners. It actually needs to go up about 4 inches in order for the dormer/room floor to become level again. I don't know if that will be possible, but I want to try jacking it up a little at a time and see if that will be feasible. I expect cracks etc., but I am redoing the house so that is not an issue or problem.
My question is, what can I put on top of the bottle jacks to spread the load out over a larger surface area. I assume I can look for and buy a couple of small steel plates to put on top of each bottle jack, but I am not sure. Or, is there something that is made for this that is available?
Thanks.
P.S. -- I tried posting this 3 times yesterday, and tried to attach two photos each time. It doesn't look like any of those posts appeared. I am using Outlook Express for a newsreader. What do I need to do to be able to attach or include photos?
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I have a second floor dormer/room that had dropped a few inches on one end (before I bought the property) due to a poor support design. I now have it supported from underneath and I want to try jacking it up a little at a time using a 20-ton bottle jack on each of the two exterior corners. It actually needs to go up about 4 inches in order for the dormer/room floor to become level again. I don't know if that will be possible, but I want to try jacking it up a little at a time and see if that will be feasible. I expect cracks etc., but I am redoing the house so that is not an issue or problem.
My question is, what can I put on top of the bottle jacks to spread the load out over a larger surface area. I assume I can look for and buy a couple of small steel plates to put on top of each bottle jack, but I am not sure. Or, is there something that is made for this that is available?
Thanks.
P.S. -- I tried posting this 3 times yesterday, and tried to attach two photos each time. It doesn't look like any of those posts appeared. I am using Outlook Express for a newsreader. What do I need to do to be able to attach or include photos?
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Use a large timber to spread out the force. Perhaps a 4x6 or 4x8 under the joists to spread out the force under the whole area being lifted. Or more, depending on the length of the area being lifted.
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Use a large timber to spread out the force. Perhaps a 4x6 or 4x8 under the joists to spread out the force under the whole area being lifted. Or more, depending on the length of the area being lifted.
....... Put the pictures on a website, and include a URL for the picture in your posting. Okay, hopefully this link will work:
http://sjimx.com
Rather than using a piece of timber directly on the top of the bottle jack, I am thinking I will need something like a steel plate. The reason is that I think the top of the bottle jack will push up into any piece of timber I use.
The space I have to work with (for the bottle jack) is about 11 inches between the top of the support column and the the cross-braces I added that will be jacked up.
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wrote in message Use a large timber to spread out the force. Perhaps a 4x6 or 4x8 under the joists to spread out the force under the whole area being lifted. Or more, depending on the length of the area being lifted.
....... Put the pictures on a website, and include a URL for the picture in your posting. Okay, hopefully this link will work:
http://sjimx.com
Rather than using a piece of timber directly on the top of the bottle jack, I am thinking I will need something like a steel plate. The reason is that I think the top of the bottle jack will push up into any piece of timber I use.
The space I have to work with (for the bottle jack) is about 11 inches between the top of the support column and the the cross-braces I added that will be jacked up.
************************************************************* You could used a steel plate, or a chunk of hardwood, if it is really a problem.
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BETA-35 wrote:

You don't post binaries to a non binary newsgroup. You post a link to the photos on a photo hosting website. Most newservers either delete binary posts on non binary groups, or they strip out the binary. Many newservers, I should say.
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Robert Allison
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On Thu, 24 Apr 2008 15:33:04 GMT, Robert Allison

And 3 wrongs don't make a right (posting the same pictures 3 times with slightly altered subject lines doesn't help). Neither does the inappropriate use of HTML.
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<netnanny bullshit deleted>
I've used bottle jacks to do some pretty amazing things. Even the little two ton ones. Yes, steel plate is good to use. You can probably get some scraps at the local steel supplier or recycler, or just scrounge. I make jacks out of pipe and the masonry screw corner things, then put a jack on top of that, screw it up, and start pumping. Handy things, and not expensive. Pretty sturdy and stiff. I found the screw corners at yard sales for a buck apiece. Bet they cost a lot more than that new.
BIG CAUTION .... be sure the base you are putting the jack on is substantial and will take the weight. Also make sure that it won't kick out sideways. Always put pieces in between jack rather than using the screw out foot, as lengthening the foot makes it more unstable.
Jack short distances, then brace, reset, and jack short distance. If the worst happens, it's supported, and will only fall a short distance.
Go slow. Be safe.
Steve
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Have a screw jack also, If the hydraulic jack fails or you dont control it right alot of damage can occur
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Maybe one day, if I try really really hard, I'll get to be perfect like you.
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A screw jack is cheap and will help with control, you want to do it over weeks or more.
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4" is alot, walls will crack, doors and windows will be issues, go slow
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A scrap recycling place may have some metal pieces to use. Steel isn't very expensive now days, in the recycling world.
You need to post to a group that uses the word "binary" in the name, in order to post photos.
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