Bidet (is that the right word)?

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On 10/3/2015 11:12 AM, Don Y wrote:

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On 10/3/2015 9:54 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

<grin> Remind me, if I ever have the chance, to *not* butter my bread (or anything else!) if invited to dinner at YOUR house!
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Don Y posted for all of us...

This is especially important after eating crabs or dealing with peppers!
--
Tekkie

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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

A marine and a sailor are in a restroom taking leaks. The marine finshes and goes to wash his hands. The sailor finishes and heads for the door...
Marine: Hey, swabbie, didn't your mother teach you to wash your hands after urinating?
Sailor: No, she taught me not to piss on my hand.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Precisely my attitude re the subject.
But, I wonder how many men are slightly embarrassed not to wash their hands when there are others standing there, so they do so?
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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How many do so cuz it's illegal not to!?
nb
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On 10/5/2015 9:24 AM, notbob wrote:

I think that pertains to staff (at food prep places, etc.).
Though, having said that, a particularly off-color joke managed to surface in my mind -- after a decade or more in hiding! :-/
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On 10/5/2015 9:22 AM, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

I guess it depends largely on your upbringing. Were you taught to wash hands before eating? Say "please" and "thank you"? Not eat stuff off the ground (or out of a trash can)? etc.
Do you think that, having left the facility without washing, your hands will MAGICALLY end up cleaner as you stroll around the store/establishment?
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In alt.home.repair, on Mon, 05 Oct 2015 12:35:10 -0700, Don Y

No, strolling does nothing, but I rub my hands on the rolls and the bread.
The gluten has antibiotic qualities.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 03 Oct 2015 02:35:03 -0700, Don Y

What kind of places are those, where volunteers or others get MRSA?
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On 10/3/2015 3:19 PM, micky wrote:

We processed medical and industrial "cast offs" (not really "waste" but, rather, things that *could* have continued value -- most often in another, "less fortunate" country!). One day, I helped another guy drag an 18" x 18" x 36" of (used) "suture scissors" into the building (forklift couldn't fit through the doorway).
Imagine looking into a box full of small, stainless steel scissors with their little "mouths" agape -- and wondering what sort of germs each may have individually been contaminated with?! No way in hell do you want to put your *hand* into said box!
Staph is all around us, all the time. All you need is exposure to a particularly nasty strain and a "skin scratch" for it to get a foothold. Gives one renewed respect for the days before antibiotics!
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 03 Oct 2015 15:30:15 -0700, Don Y

I wouldn't do it either, but don't they run these things through the sterilizers before they get rid of them.

Indeed. I don't ask for antibiotics when I have a cold, but I gather all those who do are creating antibiotic-resistant germs that may punish me as much as the people who encouraged their development.
Still, my mother was a bit shocked when I told her that I didn't cover public toilet seats with toilet paper before I sat on them. No diseases yet. I think a lot of women would burst rather than sit on a public toilet. I don't know how they travel.
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On 10/4/2015 2:32 AM, micky wrote:

You know nothing of how (or why) they have come to you. If someone hands you a handgun, do you assume the safety is ON and it is UNLOADED? :>
All you know for sure is they are sharp and probably will have no problem cutting your skin. They are "uncovered" and may have been "stored" like this for months or years (while exposed to <whatever>).
Why is someone "discarding" these items if they could just as easily sterilize/autoclave them and reuse them?

The same is true of vaccinations. There is a minimum coverage factor that protects the *population* (prevents an "outbreak" from getting established). Yet, folks seem to think it should be their "choice".

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On Friday, October 2, 2015 at 8:41:52 PM UTC-4, Don Y wrote:

A recent article in a medical journal debunked the claim that hot air dryer s are a more sanitary way to dry hands. They found that there are usually residual pathogenic bacteria on or near the washed areas that get blown int o the air and dispersed widely within the bathroom. They concluded that ho t air hand dryers are hazardous to health compared with using disposable pa per towels that don't require the user to touch a surface in order to acces s the towels.
As far as public bathroom door handles are concerned, I always take a dry, clean paper towel to the door with me and use it to open the handle. Usual ly there's a waste basket nearby. If not, I just hold it for the few minut es it takes to find one. If the bathroom only uses hot air hand dryers, I use them with regret and then get some clean toilet tissue in my hand to op en the handle of the bathroom door.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 3 Oct 2015 05:37:36 -0700 (PDT),

So doesn't this endanger everyone in a moderately busy bathroom, not just the ones that use the hot air. Surely if they're floating around they're still floating 10, 20 minutes later, An hour? Two?

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On 10/02/2015 05:51 PM, David L. Martel wrote:

It doesn't take that much, and it's clean so only one wipe needed.
--
83 days until the winter celebration (Friday December 25, 2015 12:00:00
AM for 1 day).
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On 10/02/2015 09:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

A bidet is for woman...
that should be enough info.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Possibly because the use of corncobs is in the not so distant past. For me, I prefer other methodology which is why I installed a bidet a couple of weeks ago.
Not a full blown, porcelain fixture (no room and wouldn't want one), not a seat with one built in (ridiculously pricey) but a separate unit that fits UNDER the toilet seat. They are in the $20 to $100 range, most $30-$60, mine was $30, all have plastic cases, mine has brass innards. Check Amazon.
Easy install...take off toilet seat, set bidet gizmo on throne, replace seat, hook gizmo to tank inlet using the included "T" and you are in business. They have a valve, flow is adjustable. The flow emanates from a small tube at the rear center which partially retracts when there is no flow. Some units have a slide to slightly change the angle of the tube. Some have a mixing valve which means you also have to hook to hot water too or buy a unit with a heater which means an electrical outlet. Cold water is fine for me.
Now as to their effectiveness: I am told I have hemorrhoids but I have never looked. Since installing the thing I have passed things close to the size of a pony penis and other that looks like cow plop. And all in between. The bidet has worked well. Yes, you still have to use toilet paper if only to dry your butt but mostly to aid in the removal of residual material before squirting yourself again. Moving your butt to direct the stream most effectively helps.
Do I like it? Resounding YES! I am 82, back has seen better days, all joints are stiff, overweight too...all make reaching one's nether regions difficult and this has been a big help. I'm saving a bundle on TP too, will save more because my (younger and still agile) wife wants one too.
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On 10/02/2015 08:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Crapping in a traditional bidet is as gauche as it gets. Separate fixture, next to the toilet. Think of it as a funny looking sink.
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On 10/2/2015 10:31 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

We do, by day.
Butt... butt.... ah, nevermind.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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