best way to repair door knob holes?

Page 1 of 2  
What is the best way to repair a hole in the wall that was punched in by a door handle?
My first thought is to use those steel mesh things that you just adhere over the area, mud, sand and texture.
Recently I also learned that you can cut out a square/rectangle and install a piece of replacement sheetrock held by "instabacks" - those brackets that allow you to anchor sheetrock adjacent to sheetrock. Or use a couple pieces of wood behind the wall might work for this purpose also. The problem would then be I have to mud and tape 4 sides which I'm not the best at. I have tried this in the garage and looks decent but I'm not sure if I am up for it for inside the house. Or maybe this technique might be better for bigger holes.
So I am thinking that with my skills.. the mesh patches might blend in better rather than being able to see a subtle rectangular repair.
What's is your opinion?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jj3000 wrote:

If the holes aren't too large you might consider covering them with some doorknob wall bumper plates. Some of them have rubber pads on them. They will avoid future damage unless someone REALLY whacks the doorknob into the wall. Or, at least put a bumper on after you patch the wall.
Like on this page:
http://www.adamsmfg.com/protectors.htm
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cut it out enough to get a couple of scab boards behind the hole. Secure them in place. Add the drywall patch. Finish two sides at a time. Getting in a hurry and trying to do all 4 at the same time results in frustration and an inferior job for most of us.
So whole cares if it takes a week to do it right as long as it looks great when you are done?
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I pick up some paint mixing sticks(free at HD) to use as back supports for wallboard patches;glue or screw them in,and the same for the patch.They cut easily,score them with a utility knife and snap off what you need.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My method for fixing such holes is as follows:
1) If the punch out is in one piece, save it. 2) Make a support board to place behind the hole. I usually rip a 2x4 about 1/2" thick and 5 or 6 inches long. 3) Put a temporary drywall screw in the middle of your board to hold it tight against the inside of your hole, while you put a couple of screws in your board to hold it in place. Remove your temporary screw. 4) Screw your saved piece (punch out) to the support board you installed. You can make a replacement with a hole saw, if your punch out is broken up or lost inside the wall. A rectangular patch works too of course, depending on your hole. 5) Mud/tape and sand as required. Makes a nice patch.
I also use this for repairing any holes I made to fish wires.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1. Cut off the loose wall board 2. Using construction adhesive in a caulking tube, glue thin wood such as a piece of yard stick to the back of the wall board (inside the wall) 3. Glue a piece of wall board on to wood support. 4. Patch with wall board compound (follow instructions on package.)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or those FREE paint mixing sticks.

--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You emphasize FREE but who do YOU think pays for them?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Home Depot's profits.They chose to accept slightly(very slightly) lower profits in order to give them away.The sticks price is probably so low,it's not worth the time to inventory,price them,and ring them up. And it's not like people are going to go into a collecting frenzy. People pick some up when they buy paint or other HD products.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One additional method just for grins. I don't see any single method being intrinsically superior to another: 1-Cut a square/rectangular hole be sure to make it large enough to get all damaged drywall. When you make the cuts, bevel the edges at about 30-45degrees making the outer edges wider than the inner edge. 2-Cut the patch with beveled edges to fit. The beveled edges will ensure that the patch will not fall through the hole. 3-Butter the edges of the patch with drywall mud and insert it in the hole. 4-Tape, mud, sand the patch as required.
Just my two cents worth. Dave D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, I guess so. My experience is the new backing makes cutting the patch piece less exact and more forgiving. Whatever fixes the hole and is strong is good.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jeremy snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com says...

Get a round oak medallion, at least 6" diameter, paint or stain to match the door, and install over the hole in the wall so you don't have to patch it again next yer.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
is Joshua Putnam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phila has an average daily min and max of 67.2 and 86.1 F in July. Two A ft^2 vents with one-way plastic film dampers and a 16 ft height difference and a DT (F) temp diff would allow 16.6Asqrt(16DT) cfm to flow at night, cooling a house by cfmDT Btu/h. What would the average July temp be in a house with 10K Btu/F of thermal capacitance and 200 Btu/h-F of conductance and no internal heat gain and 2 4'x4' vents with a 16' height difference, and no fan?
10 PI=4*ATN(1) 20 THv'initial house temp (F) 30 FOR D=1 TO 100'simulate 100 average July days 40 FOR H=0 TO 23 STEP .1 50 TA=(86.1+67.2)/2+(86.1-67.2)/2*SIN(2*PI*H/24)'outdoor temp (F) 60 IC=(TH-TA)*200'conductive loss (+) or gain (-) 70 IF TH>TA THEN IV.6*16*SQR(16)*(TH-TA)^1.5 ELSE IV=0'vent cooling (Btu) 80 TH=TH-(IC+IV)/10000*.1'new house temp (F) 90 NEXT H 100 NEXT D 110 PRINT TH
75.96505 (close to the average daily temp) with no vent
69.50536 (2.3 F above the min) with 2 4'x4' vents
With a higher house conductance, the vents make less difference, eg 73.3 vs 69.5 F at 1000 Btu/h-F. The vents above would move a 24-hour average 16.6x16sqrt(16(76.7-69.5)) = 2851 cfm, comparable to a whole-house fan. With humidity sensing and motorized dampers, they could help heat a house.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They said there wasn't gonna be any math on this test..........
;-]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't dispute any of the calculations. I have, however, lived in Philly in the summer. While the average max may be 86.1 degrees, that is the temperature taken at the weather station. In the city, it can easily be 90+ for days on end and lows in the high 80's as the heat sink of a brick row house and concrete sidewalks holds the energy.
Northing beat an air conditioner for comfort.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

calculations :)
In the days of the British Empire, Philly was considered a "hardship post", due to the extreme summer heat. I have had friends from New Dehli, one of the hottest places on the planet, say that West Philly, where they resided, was just as bad.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
And this is also why they became the cream cheese capital of the planet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What would be the dewpoint of this air you were ventilating with?
Could be humidifying the home. Lots of latent storage in wood and drywall.
snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think we can ignore humidity if ventilation is only used for cooling, vs heating in shoulder seasons. Can the outdoor dewpoint Tod be greater than the indoor wall temp Tw, if the outdoor dry bulb temp To is less than the indoor dry bulb Ti and Ti is close to Tw? Tdo = To/(1-TolnRo/9621), using a Clausius-Clapeyron approximation, with Tdo, To, and Ti in Rankine degrees and the outdoor RH Ro expressed as a fraction.
To/(1-TolnRo/9621) > Ti makes
To > Ti - TiTolnRo/9621, or equivalently,
9621(To-Ti) > - TiTolnRo.
This can't happen, since the left side is negative, since To < Ti, and the right side is positive, since 0 < Ro < 1.
QED.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.