Battery backup to run my furnace?

Page 3 of 3  
On 12/29/2013 09:56 PM, bob haller wrote:

they need to be replaced every 3 years. about $60 each. Vs the gasoline and upkeep on a generator. gasoline clogs fuel lines and has to be fussed with to keep working
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
the riddle wrapped in an enigma wrapped
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

- while a generator keeps providing power as long as you can feed it. Having a battery and inverter for low power short term loads to avaid running the generator full time can make sense - as long as the battery is charged by the generator when the generator is running.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2013 09:56 PM, bob haller wrote:

Do you guys have a favorite inverter for hooking to your car?
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
the riddle wrapped in an enigma wrapped
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2013 9:56 PM, bob haller wrote:

I considered this for my furnace, but decided a generator would be more cost effective for the few times the power goes out for periods longer than the thermal time constant of the house. The batteries won't run that long anyway.
What happens when the batteries are low, the furnace kicks on and preheats...later, the air handler starts, dropping the battery voltage below the cutout threshold and shuts it down...until it restarts. I just don't like gas on fire in the midst of electronics that's surging on and off. Sure, it's all protected so that can never happen. Until it does. YMMV
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/30/2013 9:12 AM, mike wrote:

My experience is that the gas valve and ignitor (well, my old furnace had pilot light) were fine. The air handler blower would not power. So, all that heat and no where to blow with it. That didn't seem safe.
I did get a two stroke ETQ generator. it doesn't start very well, needs ether if it's been sitting. But, the generator provides a few hours of run time. An hour of furnace before bed time is enough to keep the place over night. Let the generator cool, and bring it indoors. Less likely to be stolen.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/28/2013 10:04 PM, Todd wrote:

Some specs:
My forced Air fan takes 720 watts maximum to run.
The Xantrex-802-1500 is not a UPS. I can not be plugged in (charging) while it is discharging. One of the other.
The Xantrex-802-1500 http://www.xantrex.com/documents/Backup-Power/powerpack-1500/DS20060317R03_XP-Powerpack-1500EP.pdf
Product Specifications 120 Vac AC output power (continuous): 1350 W AC output surge capacity (peak): 3000 W AC output voltage: 120 Vac AC output frequency: 60 Hz AC output waveform: Modified Sine Wave
Inverter no-load current: 0.30 amps Internal battery capacity: 51 amp hours
Runtimes Sump pump 1/2 hp 300W 1 h 18 min Microwave 1000W 19 min
Or about 32 or 26 minutes. Not a lot of time.
-T
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
the riddle wrapped in an enigma wrapped
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, December 30, 2013 2:24:53 AM UTC-5, Todd wrote:

If it will only run a 300W load for 78 mins, why are you even considering it as a backup power source for a furnace? If it's reasonably cold, the furnace will be running 25 - 50% of the time. That would give you 2 1/2 to 5 hours of heat, assuming it uses 300W. In a power outage, IDK anyone that's looking for 5 hours of heat. You either don't need it if the outage is a matter of hours or you need it for days.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/30/2013 07:48 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I was thinking I'd get far longer. Make me do the math. This is really not a good solution.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
the riddle wrapped in an enigma wrapped
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2013 12:04 AM, Todd wrote:

What is wrong with parallel batteries? More batteries longer runtime. If desired, get the mondo non-venting types and parallel them.
Used UPS for small server farms are cheap, too. These allow for adding more capacity at your own leisure. Plus, the unit will give you seemless transition while you wait for power, or to start up the new generator that you get. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/30/2013 10:27 AM, Irreverent Maximus wrote:

In Parallel, the higher voltage unit will start charging the lower voltage unit and one battery will get hit much harder than the rest. Power hogging, I believe it is called. Best is in series.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
the riddle wrapped in an enigma wrapped
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/30/2013 3:32 PM, Todd wrote:

Strange. I have never seen a problem with rack-mounted battery banks in parallel. A bad battery will cause problems regardless of series/parallel connection. One would have to have some messed up wiring for there to be an issue with charge, or drain. Keep the links the same and the battery will not know the difference. Close enough and you will have to nit pick to find something wrong.
In fact, unless shorted, a bad battery in parallel will not hamper the function of the circuit. A bad battery in series will. If one battery is drawing too much on charge cycle it is weak and needs to be replaced, the same as in series. In series you will not know until you use the batteries, in parallel, you might not know at all. That is why there is such a thing as maintenance.
Many off-grid and industrial applications require that both a series and parallel set-up be implemented to obtain the desired voltage. The only fault one would notice in the parallel portion would be less run time per bank. Something one would not observe under normal usage other than an overall underperformance of the system as a whole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sure, but the "problems" are quite different. Parallel batteries will get "interesting" if a cell shorts or if there is a big difference in the age/size. A shorted or weak cell in a series connection will just limit the utility of the battery. A battery isolator will solve the problems with parallel batteries but it also wastes significant power.

A shorted cell certainly will hamper the function of the circuit. Without a battery isolator, it will draw *significant* power (as in: fire) and discharge the other battery. The voltages will equalize and that power is lost as heat.
In a series connection the, no power is lost to heating. The voltage drops by that cell but otherwise, little happens.

If you mean that you won't have a fire to tell you that something's wrong, OK.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

parallel - as a "battery" is a "series" of cells. Get 2 big-assed 6 volt batteries and put them in series rather than 2 smaller 12 volts in parallel for the same capacity.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, December 30, 2013 1:27:30 PM UTC-5, Irreverent Maximus wrote:

parrell batteries will self discharge unless all batteries are exactly the same charge level........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/30/2013 8:59 PM, bob haller wrote:

Close. The battery bank will equalize the charge of *all* of the batteries. Face it, it does not matter what type of connection is used if there is either a bad battery, or a bad termination.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bigger batteries, and parallel batteries for the sake of more current, will last longer, since discharge will be less in. Given time. I started out with two 120 amp hour batteries on the boat with isolator. It worked better with batteries in direct parallel with the trolling motor.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/31/2013 12:54 AM, gregz wrote:

Yep. Want more trolling time, add another battery in parallel. The amp hours are additive. Can't do that with a series set-up. Well, not for the same cost. Ever priced a 6-volt Trojan battery? Daaaammmmn!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

management circuitry are trouble. (and yes, I have built, owned, driven and maintained electric on-road vehicle)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

--
Jim Rusling
More or Less Retired
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, December 30, 2013 1:27:30 PM UTC-5, Irreverent Maximus wrote:

The problems are that the more batteries, the more cost, the more space they take, more replacement cost, etc. The battery pack/inverter the OP was looking at was $425. That gives him 300W for an hour and 15 mins. That's in the price range of a generator, which, IMO, and apparently most of the rest of homeowners, is a better, more practical solution. And if it's portable, it's also available for other use, anywhere you need temporary power for something.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.