Bathroom reno's

Is there any way of replacing my bathtub on the second floor of my house without having to break thru the plaster ceiling on the floor below? I was thinking that if I cut out the bathroom floor maybe that would help. I have just taken out the plaster in my kitchen and replaced with drywall and found out how hellish that was and don't want to repeat again. Thanks!
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yup.
wrote:

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easy to get at the drain.
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absolutely, if you are replacing the floor anyway! I would definitely tackle this from the top.
otherwise drywall is less expensive than tile.
are you replacing a tub or "re-locating" a tub?

are you still finding the plaster dust "everywhere" after 1 month of doing it over?
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I just plan to replace the tub. Its a small bathroom with limited options so I will try to keep things as they are and just replace them.

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no need to touch either the floor of the bathroom or the ceiling below.
Bathtubs are held in place by two or three brackets screwed into the studs of the long wall, and are connected to the waste underneath by a drain that screws in.
You should be able to unscrew your tub at the drain using either a special tool or a pair of large needle-nosed pliers. Since your drywall and tile extend over the tub's flange, it's Likely you'll have to remove tile and drywall to get the old tub out and the new one in. (Generally, I remove all the tile and drywall on the three sides of the tub and replace with green board or better.)
If you have to modify or move the drain for the new tub, you can do it by removing flooring. Only if there are leaks or a really difficult situation would you have to open up the ceiling below. Neither is a big thing, if that helps.
Ken
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thanks all for the insight!! much appreciated.

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Unless your set up is something unique, I don't see why you would have to tear out the first floor ceiling. If you can access the tub through the 2nd floor wall you should be fine. The drain might pose a small problem, depending on the type of tub you have and you may find the floor needs replacing once you get it out, but other than that....
James
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