Bad Tenants

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On Tue, 1 Feb 2011 12:24:11 -0800, "Steve B"

Another good reason to avoid doing residential rentals. If you really feel compelled to get into real estate do commercial.
--
Work is the curse of the drinking class.

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wrote

I guess vacation rentals is a form of commercial real estate. It definitely pays good.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? Read up and prepare. Learn how to care for a friend. Download the book. http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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wrote

We're residentially zoned, so that option is out, at least as far as this house is concerned.
-- Bobby G.
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On 2/1/2011 5:12 PM, Caesar Romano wrote:

Landlords have no legal obligation to accept Section 8 tenants.
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On 2/1/2011 3:24 PM, Steve B wrote:

Understood, but knowing a place welcomes section 8 drives away other potential tenants. Most landlords don't TRY to get section 8 tenants (unless they haven't been burned yet), but if the complex or houses are starting to show their age, section 8 soon becomes their bread and butter.
Standard disclaimer- not all section 8 tenants are bad. Some are merely going through a rough patch, and don't throw wild parties, shack up with drug dealers, and trash the place. An actual married couple is usually pretty safe, if both have jobs.
--
aem sends...

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wrote

Yes, that's true. It's odd, but the recipients of Section 8 welfare are both tenants and landlords. The landlords couldn't rent without subsidies for the tenants.

We have a Section 8 rental (more like a Plan 9 from Outer Space rental!) in our neighborhood that has weekly police visits, monthly social worker visits and hourly visits from people at 4AM whom I believe are there to buy drugs. The landlord had the place on the market for 8 months so he was willing to take anything. Reposession was just a few months away for him.
-- Bobby G.
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On 2/2/2011 5:04 PM, Robert Green wrote:

They have a seldom-used ordinance around here, that after the 3rd drug or 'disorderly house' bust, the city can padlock the place for a year. Very questionable constitutionality, but they have done it a few times. I hear you about the conga-lines of 5-minute visitors. That is why I moved out of my first apartment in this town. I told the manager why in no uncertain terms, and that I was tired of seeing cop cars almost every night. Yes, this is shortly after the complex was opened to section 8. She said she understood. Place finally got so bad they built a fence and electric gates around it, and now call themselves a gated community, but under the fresh siding, the buildings are still pits.
--
aem sends...

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wrote

I haven't run the issue to ground, but it seems like something the Feds would do - screw ME for trying to keep my property in proper order and not rented out to someone who obviously can't pay their rent without a government handout. I think that's part of the problem. It's hard to respect property that someone else is paying to rent for you.
-- Bobby G.
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On 2/1/2011 3:24 PM, Steve B wrote:

I checked into this and there is no requirement to take section 8. Maybe you are confusing this with various other discrimination laws?
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this
retiring
us.
I know it's a question of percentages but even removing all the newspapers and TV court shows from the equation, just the experiences of my neighbors tell me that renting in my area is more perilous than it is in other, less tenant-friendly jurisdictions. Just how much so is a matter for investigation.

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Not sure if that's an option, and don't want to be hit with a discrimination suit if I turn one down.

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These are hard times. It makes people more desperate than they normally might be. I just want to make sure I have all the information I need to make a competent decision. If the thread wanders around a bit to the absurd, then so be it. It wouldn't be Usenet if it didn't! (-:
-- Bobby G.
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What kind of area is it, what are the people like. I rent apartments everyday, your area determines what you get. But I demand married couples, both work, no smoking and refrences. Houses are hard to rent because of cost.
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wrote:

this
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so,
<What kind of area is it, what are the people like. I rent apartments everyday, your area determines what you get. But I demand married couples, both work, no smoking and refrences. Houses are hard to rent because of cost.>
Working class, small 2 bedroom houses with off-street parking. I agree with your requirements for prospective tenants. These houses tend to rent because they are small. The Section 8 rental is getting $2K a month and my neighbor gets $800 a month for her nicely finished basement with their own side entrance.
-- Bobby G.
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I don't do section 8. If they don't pay their rent it takes 23 days to get them out. If they are paying and I don't want them there anymore it takes 33 days to get them out.
Here you simply serve them with a notice to pay or vacate or a notice to vacate. The judge does the rest. There are no valid reasons for not paying your rent. The judge doesn't even listen to the excuses.
Colbyt
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retiring
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Some have suggested that's not legal. Can you shed any light on how you refuse Section 8 and whether it's legal to do so?

That's how it's supposed to work, but this A88hole on the People's Court apparently found that if the unit is not in good repair (i.e., he simply broke out a window) that the eviction process is put on hold until the repairs are made.

paying
If I am not mistaken, you live in Lexington KY where the judges are probably a tad more sympathetic to landlords then they are here. The more I research, the less I find I like about being a landlord, at least in suburban MD.
-- Bobby G.
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I do live in Lexington and the judges simply enforce the law as it is written. Sympathy does not enter into it. If you are not happy with the laws in your state, lobby for change. Personally I would not be a landlord in the northeast or the peoples republic of California.
There is no legal requirement, at least in this state, to accept section 8 or any other form of subsidized housing; so it is not a Federal law. I have accepted it in the past. I am an authorized Landlord. For your area a simple call to the section 8 office will get you an answer to your question as it applies to you.
Colbyt
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There's a very definite geographical pattern to where it's good to be a landlord.

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That's a good idea. I know that we have some section 8 rentals in my neighborhood already, but I don't know any of the terms of the deals. I'll search out some answers . . .
-- Bobby G.
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As a code enforcement officer, I suggest to owners that the rental contract identify them (the owner or representative) as the responsible party for the replacement of the HVAC filter. And that they be very clear about that and the other elements of the contract at rental time. On a certain day of the month, at a specific time, the filter will be changed by the owner. (15th of the month, at 7PM). Tenants can be there if they want. And even though checking the smoke detector function is a tenant responsibility, I suggest doing that at the same time as the filter, and being very obvious about the monthly documentation. Satisfies Landlord-Tenant law, and puts the owner/representative in the unit for a condition awareness once a month. And if a prospective tenant balks at the very idea of you doing it instead of them (I have seen incredibly dirty filters), you can count that you may have just dodged that one. Also, be very wary of people that are ready/willing/having to move in months of bad weather. And even if you don't live there, you are still a neighbor. Several owners in my assignment area have a small sign, like twice the size of a business card, on the storm door facing out. That says "If anyone sees problems with grass, trash, or vehicles at this property, call Property Manager at........." If a neighbor knows that the owner is able to be contacted instead of trying to ignore all issues but collecting the rent, my agency is less likely to be getting the complaint.
Just suggesting.
as
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wrote:

this
code
something
do
so,
<As a code enforcement officer, I suggest to owners that the rental contract identify them (the owner or representative) as the responsible party for the replacement of the HVAC filter. And that they be very clear about that and the other elements of the contract at rental time.>
Yes, it seems that a lot of trouble in rentals comes from not understanding responsibilities under the lease.
<On a certain day of the month, at a specific time, the filter will be changed by the owner. (15th of the month, at 7PM). Tenants can be there if they want. And even though checking the smoke detector function is a tenant responsibility, I suggest doing that at the same time as the filter, and being very obvious about the monthly documentation.>
That sounds like a very smart thing to do. Don't the tenants complain? Some people are obessive about their privacy.
<Satisfies Landlord-Tenant law, and puts the owner/representative in the unit for a condition awareness once a month.>
I would venture a guess that a monthly "look-see" is the best way to keep things from going off the rails.
<And if a prospective tenant balks at the very idea of you doing it instead of them (I have seen incredibly dirty filters), you can count that you may have just dodged that one.>
Yes, I suspect that would be true.
<Also, be very wary of people that are ready/willing/having to move in months of bad weather. And even if you don't live there, you are still a neighbor. Several owners in my assignment area have a small sign, like twice the size of a business card, on the storm door facing out. That says "If anyone sees problems with grass, trash, or vehicles at this property, call Property Manager at........." If a neighbor knows that the owner is able to be contacted instead of trying to ignore all issues but collecting the rent, my agency is less likely to be getting the complaint.>
That, too, sounds like an excellent idea. Thanks!
-- Bobby G.
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Robert Green wrote the following:

I've read all the other responses. The one thing I would recommend is to get in touch with a real estate rental agency. Let them do the selection and take care of the rent collection. They take a percentage of the monthly rent that they set, so the higher the rent, the greater the percentage. You won't have to check on the house occasionally since the agent will do that too. Besides, they are up on the laws.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 2/2/2011 9:28 AM, willshak wrote:

In Florida, realtors are starving...in our condo, they would rent to ANYONE. The one anyone was an alcoholic woman, with teen daughter, who brought home homeless people to drink with. She trashed a very nice condo..no money to sue her for.
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