Backyard "Platform"


Our relatively new yard is in transition and we currently have no patio or deck. I would like to assemble something semi-permanent that would be easy to do, as well as easy to disassemble when we upgrade to an outdoor "room".
My idea was to use 2"x6"x12' pressure treated lumber laid flat at intervals directly on the ground and anchor them to the soil with either rebar or stakes to prevent movement. These boards would be leveled and with a slight pitch for any water runoff. Then construct the platform floor across these boards also using 2"x6"x12' pressure-treated boards, attaching them with either galvanized or stainless steel screws.
We live in the desert, so there's no concern about ground movement due to winter heaving or damage from excessive moisture.
This would give us a 12' x 12' platform roughly 4" above the ground, where we would place our grill and umbrella table and chairs.
Does this sound feasible?
TIA
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Feasible, but expensive. I'd go with large square (18"+) concrete pavers with a minimal layer of sand for leveling. When you're through with them they can simply be stacked in a corner, or sold on Craigslist or similar since they will not degrade.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri 29 Aug 2008 04:36:07p, Pete C. told us...

The pavers are seldom over 2" thick and I really do want about 4" height to avoid the feeling of "sitting right on the ground". The pavers also absorb and radiate heat far more than wood, which is a *big* issue in our area It's not a bad idea, for the very reasons you mentioned, but wouldn't really give me what I want. I haven't priced anything out yet, so perhaps that should be my first step.
Thanks for your input, Pete.
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Having spent some time barefoot on a raised wooden deck (grayed PT) as well as normal gray-white concrete in Houston recently when it was 110 out, I can assure you there isn't much difference in heat absorption and radiation.
If you want the height, Lay a perimeter ring of the pavers, then fill inside with the leveling sand tamped and leveled, and then place the top layer. You get your 4" height, using only a few more pavers and a little more sand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri 29 Aug 2008 07:21:23p, Pete C. told us...

I'll be sure to give this some more thought before making a decision. Thanks!
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not a big fan of doing things twice. You'll be spending money on wood for something temporary. Is there anyway that you can build something that you can use now that will eventually be incorporated into the finished yard?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri 29 Aug 2008 05:08:05p, John Grabowski told us...

What I want to end up with is an "Arizona Room", and this wood would not be appropriate, plus we would have someone else build the room. Arizona Rooms are generally built of aluminum, screening, glass, and steel, on a concrete slab base. If I knew exactly what the future configuration of the concrete base would be in the future, I could have it put in place now,k but I really don't know at this point. However, the yard is large enough that this platform unit could be moved to another location for a 2nd "patio" type structure. Our entire yard is desert-scaped; there is no grass, only decomposed granite, sand and chunk granite. The landscaping is all cactii and succulents. I don't think we'd lose out on this wood.
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

You can look at those rooms now, see what the largest size you'd want is, and then pour a pad a bit larger. In the future excess concrete can be readily cut off with an appropriate saw, or you can fill the extra space with some planters and foliage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri 29 Aug 2008 07:23:58p, Pete C. told us...

patio
would
or
due
into
not
no
One other factor at present is that concrete work is very costly right now in the Phoenix area. This was one thing I was trying to avoid. Still it's worth getting estimates. I would not be able to do the work myself, and I want a perfect concrete surface when it is done.
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Wood laid flat on the ground would be tough to secure, it seems. How about landscape cloth with large pavers and river rock on top. We have that as an "extension" of our patio - patio has a balcony above so we can't use the grill under the balcony. Have about 8" space between pavers filled in with the rock. Easy to move the grill if we need to and plenty of flat area for chairs. The l.s. cloth and rock would be nice and tidy under a deck when you get around to it. Easy to clean with leaf blower, no other maint. Cheap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri 29 Aug 2008 05:21:54p, Norminn told us...

Nice idea, but I really want an uninterrupted flat surface that is elevated about 4" off the ground.
Your idea would certainly be more attractive than mine, but mine would be more functional for my needs.
When we laid railroad ties back in Ohio, we secured them into the ground with rebar. Nothing ever moved. That was my plan with the boards that would be in contact with the ground. Either rebar or stakes. Once constructed, I donn't think it would have a chance of moving.
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Norminn told us...

How about large pavers on 8"x8"x16" hollow block piers with vertical holes?
Make your own 4'x4' 100 lb glass-fiber concrete pavers averaging 1/2" thick with welded wire fence reinforcement and bumps below the corners that rest in pier holes on 4' centers?
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

Find some untreated railroad tie stock, and just lay them out like the deck of an old battleship, staggering the joints? A few rebar pins around the edges and anyplace one starts bowing, should keep them from moving around.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri 29 Aug 2008 07:04:58p, Pat told us...

A wood chip or mulch top surface would defeat my purpose. I need to be able easily move chairs with casters and a portable gas grill across the surface. The grill would probably be alright, but people sitting in chairs and trying to move them would probably mire down into the surface. Plus, I don't find the idea of sitting in the midst of wood chips or mulch very inviting. :-)
I could probably re-use this unit in another area of the yard when our plans change the the initial area.
Your idea is good and interesting, but probably better for a different application than mine.
Thanks...
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wayne,
It certainly sounds like a waste of energy! By your replies to other posters, you appear to be looking for support on your idea, and not really open to other ideas.
However, I will tell you what I would do. And, being you formally lived in Ohio, what many in Ohio do.
Either have the concrete placed now....... OR Construct a permanent deck. Build it level, with no pitch. Say for instance, your proposed room would be a 10x12. I would build the deck as a 16x 20 (just an example). Positioning the deck, so it would be offset, not centered to the proposed room. This would leave me a deck on 2 sides of my room, after the room was built. It would be enough room to set your grill, a couple of chairs etc, on the outside of the room. Treated CDX Ply or similar could be used for the inside of the room once the room is built, or the layout could call for the CDX to be installed to room size, then the room built on it. Your initial layout would be critical so you don't build your deck to high initially.
Those aluminum/glass rooms can be built to any size. Either way, wood or concrete base, I would definitely have a much larger base for my grill etc. Otherwise, it certainly will look silly with a grill sitting in the sand.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri 29 Aug 2008 07:33:35p, Toffee Monday told us...

This is the best alternative I've heard yet, and I'm open to it if I can afford it. The configuration is actually one I had already thought of for the future room. Someone else would probably hve to executde it, though, as I don't have all the equipment it might need.
For several reasons, though, I don't know if I could handle the work myself, due to age and heath issues. I could envision the relative simplicity of my original idea, with all boards precut and just screwed together.
Still, it's worth looking into having someone put the initial deck up and get estimates for it.
Thanks for your ideas...
--
Wayne Boatwright

*******************************************
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If it was me doing this job,I would use four 12' = 4x4's for the base & nail my 2x6's to them. Then when your base settles into the sand ( which it will) you will still be at least 2" off the ground. Put it togeather with deck screws than you cake it apart.
Get out there ,build it & enjoy JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 29 Aug 2008 23:32:23 GMT, Wayne Boatwright

What about using those DekBlock concrete piers? We used those for our deck, and they worked great. You could do your wood frame floor very easily on these, with 2x6 joists and 5/4 planks. Ours has held up very well after 5 years in western New York and no doubt would do just fine in Arizona.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.