Automotive floor jacks - bottle or floor jack

Page 1 of 2  
I want to get one (at least) hydraulic jack to use if I need to change a flat in my garage or driveway. The crappy standard equipment jacks that come in a car I just don't trust.
What is better/easier to use for changing tires (or plain lifting up the corner of a car) - a hydraulic bottle jack or a hydraulic floor jack? I want to be sure also that the car doesn't slip off the jack while I'm working on the car. I know I need to also get some jack stands for safety.
Thanks. Walter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Floor jack.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Walter Cohen wrote:

You need three wheel chocks what ever jack you feel most comfortable using.
For me, a floor jack with at least a 16" lift was best.
A lot depends upon what vehicle you are lifting.
For my uses, a bottle jack just doesn't have enough lift.
There is no "one size fits all" answer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 26 Jan 2008 17:56:57 -0500, "Walter Cohen"

Floor jack! DO not crawl under this vehicle!! A bottle jack tends to slip; causing the vehicle to fall...even with a floor jack.
Perform this work on a flat surface and block the tires on the ground.
Oren --
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Floor jack. Bottle jacks have small lift points, harder to position, shorter lift, and no give should the car move a quarter inch or so during the lift, all of which a floor jack makes a lot more forgiving. Besides, there being types made for the job.
Always block the other wheels, AT LEAST the wheel kitty-corner to the wheel you're lifting. If lifting a front wheel set the emergency brake. Always have car in Park for changing tires, never neutral. Jack stands not usually necessary for changing a tire but a good idea because "stuff" does happen. Only lift as far as necessary, never more.
Never hi jack,
Twayne
--
Twayne

Tired of MS Office and their shananigans?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Floor Jack. And if you are going to get under the vehicle ALWAYS use jack stands.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
if you are getting under the car make sure its sturdy. don't trust a jack, maybe lower the weight onto a solid timber or something like that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What are you going to use when you get a flat elsewhere? The scissors jack works just fine. I've lifted up full-size vans on the "crappy standard equipment jack".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The jack that comes with the car is for changing tires. What's wrong with that?

You can get floor jack and jack stands combo. They are cheap.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Jones wrote:

Agree with the floor jack and jackstands, disagree with the cheap. The 20-buck specials tend to leak down, even when almost brand new. I'm sure most are made in China these days, but look for one that isn't visibly leaking past the seals, and has some fit and finish to it. It shouldn't look like a blacksmith made it out back. As to the jackstands- stuff that can kill you is no place to cut corners. No cheap cast ones, no spot-welded thin stamped metal ones. Nothing that shows any bare metal that will rust, especially in joints.
aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Those floor jacks do leak. That's why you don't work under the car without jack stands. I have not heard jack stands falling apart as long as they are in good condition and used as intended.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a $20 bottle jack that I've had for 6 years without a problem. The way the axle and differential are put together on my Jeep Cherokee mandates some sort of jack with a small lift point. No signs of leakage, but it gets used maybe every 6 months, at most.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>
That's what I use for my Tundra truck tire rotation, as recommended by a master mechanic. Fast, easy, and safe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's what I was thinking too. He wants the jack for changing flats. How many flats does anyone have in their driveway, as opposed to elsewhere? Or how many total that it's worth getting a different jack?
On the other hand, if you do more work on your own car, like brakes, then a floor jack is the way to go.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
get a good floor jack bottle jacks have their place but are less safe
Walter Cohen wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have both. For my Jeep Cherokee, when changing the font tires (rotation) my floor jack doesn't have enough lift, so I use the bottle jack. Those AND a pair of jack stands are what you need. They are cheap enough in any event, and you will eventually need all of them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bottle jack is easier to store, and you can take it with you when you travel...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you're talking cars and light trucks under one ton, then a floor jack will be of great use.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok - thanks to all for your suggestions!
Walter

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Another consideration is that a bottle jack often will not fit under an axle, especially with a flat tire. There is a place for both so if you do much work, you should have both.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.