Auto Battery Connection Repair?

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Hi,
A "friend" managed to strip the bolt-hole for the positive cable connection. Now it'll no longer tighten sufficiently to allow a firm/reliable connection.
Is there any reasonable and permanent way to fix/correct this?
I"ve tried putting some galv. steel wire into the thread area but it either does no good or makes it too hard to seat the bolt far enough to create surface to surface pressure of the cable to the battery. Using solder instead I seem to have created a sufficiently tight connection to maintain the connection; for now, anyway. Since solder has no "memory" it's sooner or later going to let the connection loosen again; probably sooner in our changeable weather.
Anyone have a better fix? The battery is almost new or I'd just buy another one but it costs an arm and a leg.
HTH,
Twayne
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Blind tap of a slightly larger size. Because it's probably soft metal you can "make" a tap using a file and a bolt. Just file a couple cutting grooves lengthwise in a bolt. I use the corner of a file and angle it so the cutting edge is close to 90deg.
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Too Risky. Just use solder, it is lead and the stripped threads were probably also lead.
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wrote:

Ok I'll bite. Why is that "risky"?
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What hapens if he/she drills a bit too deep and goes into the cell which leaks acid onto him/her and everything nearby?
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wrote:

My advice didn't include drilling. Usually if you go for a slightly larger bolt you can skip the drilling. And I'm thinking this is a lead alloy which should be easy to tap out to a bigger size.
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Twayne wrote:

A helicoil or equivalent or a larger bolt are probably the only viable options. You could fill the stripped hole with lead to redrill and retap, but you'd have a hard time not melting the plastic case in that area.
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<snip>

This might be a good time to just get a new battery....
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If it cost and arm and leg it probably has posts as well as side mounts. buy or rig an adapter to use the top post for the connection rather than the side tap.

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wrote:

The OP clearly stated it had no posts - only the threaded "side post" connectors. I'd be looking at an oversized bolt for a simple fix. For a better fix, I would, if it was me on MY battery,I'd get a stainless steel bolt the right size and heat it, in place, with my big electric csoldering copper to hot re-form the threads in the lead.
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wrote:

A slightly larger bolt is unlikely to fit thru the hole in the battery cable end without drilling that out as well.....You could also fill the hole with JB Weld and screw in a headless bolt and secure the battery cable with a nut or you could go to the auto parts store and buy a conversion kit and convert them to post mounts...HTH......
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wrote:

Except the conversion kit depends on that stripped thread.
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This exact thing was discussed at length just a few weeks ago. Look it up. Larry
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Lp1331 1p1331 wrote:

They put little tiny hex bolt heads on the connectors so you have to use a small socket or wrench and not put too much torque on it. But as usual some lunk heads could screw up an anvil.
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Lp1331 1p1331 wrote:

All indications are that the OP of both threads is the same.
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If that is the case, he could have gone to his FLAPS and purchased a Helicoil kit in the appropriate size (5/16 UNC? I think?) and had it fixed weeks ago. But I guess some people don't like the answers they receive...
nate
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On Mon, 8 Feb 2010 16:58:32 -0500, benick wrote:

JB weld will not conduct electricity. Check with a battery store for a solution.
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That's possible. But drilling out the connector or filing it out a little is not a big deal. I would still take this path over the helicoil because the helicoil will be a dissimilar metal and will have galvanic corrosion issues. As others have pointed out jb weld is out cause this has to be a metal to conduct.
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On Tue, 9 Feb 2010 04:59:15 -0800 (PST), jamesgangnc

The hole and the screw are already dissimilar metals. Since this is a kludge, anyway, I don't see that as a serious deal killer. If they have galvanized helicoils, then the helicoil and the cable bolt would be the same material. I don't think it's that important anyway. Stainless will work just fine. A $50-$75 replacement battery would be the "good" fix.
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On Feb 9, 8:08am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Most garden-variety Helicoils are stainless. I would probably insert the Helicoil dry and then use anti-seize paste on the bolt threads.
nate
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