Attaching Things to Stucco Exterior


In my neighborhood, all the houses have stucco exteriors. What's the best way to attach something to the side of a house that's covered in stucco? (Examples might be an iron ornament, a hose reel or a flagpole.)
Thanks.
-Fleemo
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Under the stucco there will be a layer of sheathing (boards, plywood, or OSB). You need to drill a neat hole through the stucco in order to use a screw to secure your ornament, or such. Hole size depends on screw size, and the drill bit needs to be a masonry type carbide tip. If you have many holes to drill, a low cost diamond bit from Harbor Freight, for example, would be a good choice. Use stainless steel square drive screws if rust stains from conventional screws is problem. HTH
Joe
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Joe wrote:

I have used the above-described method to attach house numbers, trellises, light fixtures, and flower box brackets to my stucco house. As others have pointed out, the method depends on what is under the stucco, in my case the stucco is over traditional wood-frame construction. For the flower box brackets I made sure I was going into studs and used some sturdy lag bolts. For other applications just regular wood screws into the sheathing. On areas that take direct rain sometimes I squeeze in a little caulk to seal the hole. --H
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Depends. If the stucco is over block or over wood sheathing different methods are used. Which is yours?
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You're typin' to a real novice here. How would one discern the difference?

And I'm afraid that question's way out of my league, sorry. :}

In an ill-fated attempt to attach a hose reel to my house, I used a masonry bit to drill through the stucco, but drilled through to find empty space. My guess is the contractor used chicken wire between wood studs as a subsurface for the stucco. Attempts to use a mollybolt were disasterous. :(
I appreciate the input here.
-Fleemo
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On 2 Jan 2007 12:12:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Oren
"My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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(Oops) Most likely "tar paper, chicken wire and foam" under stucco.
Heavy stuff ... find a stud. I have been successful using Liquid Nails to hold fake stones on stucco (desert) brace and allow to cure.
-- Oren
"My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
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replying to fleemo17, Annemarie wrote: Hello Fleemo,
I have seen professionals use a wireless device to find the studs behind stucco.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Traditional cement based stucco, or EIFS (acrylic stucco on foam board)?
R
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

nice for heavy stuff. Caulk works for small stuff, like house numbers.
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On 1 Jan 2007 19:32:30 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Sounds like they were all built by the same builder. Talk to several of your neighbors, to find out if they are all built the same and what they are made out of. You really can't just ask one, because there are it seems a lot of people who just make up answers when they don't konw the real answer. (It's amazing, really.)
You can also ask how they have attached things and if they have been happy wity it, or you can use the advice you get here.
This is also a very good way to get to know your neighbors.

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