Attaching a hose holder to a house with vinyl siding

My wife wants to attach a cheapo garden hose holder to the side of our house near the hose spigot. The house has vinyl siding. Should I just drill a small hole and then screw the hose holder on?
Thanks...
Mike
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If you hit a stud, no problem. If you don't his a stud, it will eventually pull out of the sheathing and then you have holes left in the siding. Get a hose reel that sits on the ground. Get a good one as the cheap ones are frustrating to use and a waste of money. Triton makes the absolute best, but are pricey.
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Nothing is easy in home repair!!! We tried to replace the packing washer in our outside hose bib and that seemed to go OK, but we removed the screw securing the handle and that screw seemed to plug a hole in the hollow stem which now leaks.
What is the purpose of a hole in the hollow stem and how do you stop THAT from from leaking?
The guys at Lowes never heard of such a thing.
Here is a picture to help you understand what I have...
http://mysite.verizon.net/bjkass123/bibhole.jpg
Thanks for any ideas of what it's for and how to fix.
Joy
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Hose reels that attach to the side of the house work fine, and don't pull all over the place like bulky stand-alone reels. I've had 10-20 dollar ones that last many years. Use a stud finder to locate the 2x4's, mark with pencil, then do a 1/16th" test drill to see if you get wood. If the pilot hole shows shavings, make the hole the final size, and mount reel. Sometimes, if you are lucky, mounting holes are spaced to fit typical stud spacing. Roger
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On Fri, 1 Jun 2007 12:01:18 -0700, "Roger" <sherryrogeratcomcastdotnet> wrote:

Or just get a 5 or 6 ft piece of treated 4x4 or 4x6 and put it in the ground about 3 feet, then attach your reel to it. That way you wont ruin your sideing for a hose reel that will likely fall apart in a year. If you need more width to the post, just get a 4x8 or nail a cross piece of 2x6 to it before you hang the reel. I have aluminum siding and I wanted to attach a drinking fountain. Rather than wreck the siding, and plus I needed a 6 inch wide bolt pattern, which no stud would allow, I got a 4x6 post and used that. I did not use cement on the post, although a hose reel has is being pulled, so it depends on the soil. In hard clay, you probably dont need cement once the fill hardens good. If you want to get real fancy put the post elsewhere in the yard and run a hose to the reel and put a spigot on the post to connect the reel. That way you can put it where its most handy.
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I wouldn't drill a hole in vinyl siding, or aluminum siding, or stucco, or stone, or bricks, etc. He's right, the thing will break or rip out, and then you'll have a hole, bigger than the one you drilled. OK in wood that can be repaired and painted to match, or the mortar between bricks. (even then, I wonder how hard to match the color of the mortar, and how long it takes before it's weathered enough to match.

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