Any kerosene heaters that burn dirty I should avoid buying?

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (misterfact) wrote in message

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It's a fuel, when burned there are combustion products. They consist of carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide. So an unvented unit delivers those products to the room. Plan to have a window open to provide combustion air? Plan to keep children out of there because they're more vunerable to the carbon monoxide? http://www.sleekhome.com/help/Kerosene-Heaters-38600.htm

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As others have said they are all dirty. Unless you can find one that vents outside. A friend of mine in Iowa has one that looks like a window a/c installed in a 4 season patio. We came in from dinner one night and decided to play pool and his boy turned on this Kerosun unit and with in 20 minutes it was toasty. It was just above freezing that night. They only run it when they are home and awake.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (misterfact) wrote in message

Nearly all kerosene heater are built quite similar. As a result, I have never had a kerosene heater that when adjusted and working properly burns dirty even with what people call a bad batch of kero. There is a simple checklist to make sure your heater burns properly, and every person I have run into with a dirty burning heater apparently lacks the ability to read and comprehend operating and maintenance instructions. Most people are negative about kerosene heaters, because they dont know how to use them properly.
1. Make sure the wick is level (most newer units have pins to assure this, but not always)
2. Make sure the wick is in good shape (it should be burned dry periodically to burn off the carbon deposits on the glass fibers)
3. Make sure you adjust the flame to the appropriate level. Most heaters have negigable heat adjustment, however, most people feel obligated to try produce more or less heat by adjusting the wick. Too low a flame or too high a flame and you will get plenty of odor. Once you fire the unit up, you need to check on it after 10 - 15 minutes of running to adjust the flame height and then it is good to go.
My family has been burning these things for over 20 years and never has someone said, whoa what is that smell. Better yet, I have not had the multiple CO detectors in my house ever register a blip using both my heaters simultaneously (Kerosun Omni 85 and Kerosun Omni 105). In regards to brands, the Toyostove/Kerosun units are typically regarded as the best in the business and usually sell between 100 - 200 dollars. If you are still worried about fumes/toxic byproducts you might consider the Toyostove DC 100. This is the double burner design and is probably the cleanest burning heater available. Further the double burn allows you to adjust the heat output. It is a nice heater but will cost you up to 300 bucks. As another note, if you use the kerosene heater very sparingly you might consider the kerosene substitutes that sell at Home Depot and other stores. These burn cleaner, hotter, and have no odor, but you will pay up to 8 bucks a gallon.
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On 17 Oct 2004 12:26:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Ceraboy) wrote:
I agree with everything here. However, you should buy a kerosene heater that is easy to remove, clean and reinstall the wick. I have a Dyna-Glow RMC-95-C7 and Heat Mate, Dyna-Glow have a slightly larger tank capacity therefore, last much longer. But, took me more than 2 hours to clean and replace the wick. The reason being there are two studs in on opposite sides of the wick you need to align to the heater mechanism, it took ages to get it right. While the Heat Mate took 15 to 20 minutes to replace the wick.
If I have to buy another, I will almost certain buy a heater that is easy to remove and reinstall the wick.

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On 17 Oct 2004 12:26:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Ceraboy) wrote:
Buy the way how much you are paying for kerosene? I got my at a 60 miles round trip from a farm Cooperative at $1.25/gal, elsewhere will cost from $3.25/gal to $5.00/gal.
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(Ceraboy) wrote:

Wow, $1.25 per gallon is a great deal, I would trade in my electric syhpon for kero at that price. I get mine at a local gas station about a mile from my house for $2.19 - 2.49 per gallon ( it is nice undyed 1-K kerosene ). Home Depot sells the kero at about 5 bucks per gallon by the gallon jug and the kero substitute for 8 bucks a gallon around my place. I should look into the some places that are more rural and sell by the drum or at least 5 gallon size. How much kero do you buy at once at the co-op. I usually only keep 10-15gallons on hand since the refill site is so darn close.
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On 18 Oct 2004 14:16:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Ceraboy) wrote:
Each trip, I bought 40 gals (8X5/gal containers) for $60.75 (seventy-five cents sales tax!). You would do well this winter to explore around your County for the nearest cooperative to buy cheap kerosene. Just in case anyone is skeptical, the kerosene I bought is K1 and dye red.
This morning on NPR news, reported that there will be less than normal supply of fuel oil available this winter. I suggest that you stock up more than your normal need.
For those who are thinking of buying a kerosene heater, remember to buy one that can last at least 8 hrs per filling and make sure the wick can be remove and replace easily, ie: the wick has no metal studs (3) sticking out. It's a pain in the arse(sorry) to replace them. Don't know if the kerosene heater's wick has any metal studs, buy a spare wick, examine it carefully and metal studs free. I normally have two to three spare wicks for each winter.

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The used one from the garage sale that's running on a three year old wick.
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