An outdoor pole lamp burns out frequently

I have a pole light in my front yard. It takes three 60 watt bulbs with those small screw in bases (candelabra??). Two of the three burn out about every 3-4 weeks (it is on an "electric eye" so only on sundown-sunup). I replaced the lamp itself about 7 months ago because of the same thing happening. Any idea as to why they burn out so quickly and/or ways to stop it?
-- "America is at that awkward stage. It's too late to work within the system, but too early to shoot the bastards."-- Claire Wolfe
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Vibration is a possible cause. These cute lamps are not designed for rough service and I doubt that you can find any rated for this kind of service. Over heating is also a distinct possiblity. 60 watts is kind of high for this type of lamp especially if the fixture is poorly vented.
Try using 40 or 25 watt bulbs instead.
Check to see that the pole is solidly anchored in the ground with no side to side looseness.
Rubber mount the lamp fixture to the pole so that it can flex when gusts of wind hit the pole.
Make sure no tree limbs are near enough to hit the pole.
Add a dimmer in series with the lamps and dim it down to the minimum you can live with.
Buy a bulk pack of the little lamps.
Convert it to take standard medium screw base and then use vibration or rough service bulbs in long life (130v) if available.
Regards,
John
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I would convert this to some other bulb.. 3x60watt bulbs0 watts thats kinda bright I bet..maybe convert it to a rough service type bulb like for a garage opener.
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Are there other lights on the same circuit? How do they fare? You might consider energy-saving bulbs, if you can find some that'll fit.
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On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:38:48 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Kurt Ullman) wrote:

Vibration.
If you had a normal bulb socket I would recommend using a light bulb saver disc. Just place the disc inside the socket before screwing in the bulb. It reduces the voltage and inrush current enough to protect the bulb, or use the type of bulb that traffic lights use. They are extremely durable, but I don't know were you can get them.
In your case an alternative is to put a resistance in line and drop the voltage before the bulbs. Shoot for 80-90 volts and you should be fine. If you have access to wire wound resisters try a 40 watt resister around 20 ohms. The resister will get hot so mount it safely.
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On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 17:38:48 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Kurt Ullman) wrote:

How many hours are they on? How many hours are they rated for? Maybe yer gettin' what you should.
Try buying a different brand.
Try bending up the center contact in the socket...and make sure this contact is not pitted. Clean it up if it is. Make sure the BREAKER is off for this circuit before you start.
Finally...putting on a dimmer switch was a good idea.
Good luck.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Cat...the OTHER white meat!
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(Kurt Ullman)

about
stop it?

I had a similar problem with 6 pole lights at my drive. It seems that vibration from wind was taking the lamp filaments out. Changed to CFL's and haven't had a failure in over a year.
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CFL's ???? I am assuming you don't mean Canadian Football League (grin). BTW: Thanks to you and everyone else who has given me good ideas.
k
-- "America is at that awkward stage. It's too late to work within the system, but too early to shoot the bastards."-- Claire Wolfe
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Kurt Ullman) wrote in message wrote:

Just one further. If you are after light vice style, replace with flourescent screw ins (if they'll fit). I had the same problem with two outdoor lights, replace bulbs constantly. Replaced with the flouros two years ago and haven't had a failure since.
Harry K
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3-4 weeks is probably about normal. If you want extended life(1-2 years) replace them with traffic signal bulbs. I got mine at Grainger. Also you can replace them with flourescent lamps and do away with the switch and just leave them on all the time. Flourescent lamps seem to be limited more by the # of off and on cycles than hrs of operation.
(Kurt Ullman)

with
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and
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But the one that doesn't burn out did about 9 months consistently.
-- "America is at that awkward stage. It's too late to work within the system, but too early to shoot the bastards."-- Claire Wolfe
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