American Farmers Fight Rise In Hay Thefts

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For those that don't know much about how hay is processed, here is a brief rundown of the tasks involved. 1. Once the grass grows to a significant height, a tractor with a mowing attachment mows the field, leaving the grass cutting on the ground. 2. After a period of drying time (we used to wait a day or two), a tractor with a raking attachment goes over the cut grass and rakes the hay into rows. 3. Then a tractor with a baling attachment goes over each row and gathers the hays to put into bales of hay. These bales can be round cylinders or rectangle blocks, as well as fairly small (50-100 Lbs) to very large 1000+ LBs bales. 4. The bales can be left in the hay field, but most farmers move the bales into a barn for storage, or into an outside area that livestock doesn't have access to. This is to allow the hay fields to grow back. The actually moving of the bales, if small in size, can be done by hand using a flat-bed trailer and pickup truck. The larger bales are usually moved via a tractor witha pole attachment.
It wouldn't be much of an effort for someone in a pickup hauling a large flat-bed trailer with a tractor on the it to steal the hay. Just pull up to a pasture where the hay is located, drive the tractor off the trailer, pick up a few bales of hay and stack them on the trailor, drive the tractor back onto the trailer, and then drive the pickup away.
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So the cops won't notice anyone transporting a tractor on a trailer along with several tons of hay?
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the Wind Comes

# # So the cops won't notice anyone transporting a tractor on a trailer # along with several tons of hay?
Why would they Truck mounted forklifts are a dime a dozen, and hardly a gay goes by without on such rig being seen.
You really have to stop projecting your "provincial" perspective on other places
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On 12-05-2012 12:48, harry wrote:

I see you know very little about hay.
--
Wes Groleau

Change is inevitable.
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I used to own a farm. I can see you have a big mouth and know absolutely nothing about hay.
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On Thursday, December 6, 2012 12:18:03 AM UTC-7, harry wrote:

Owning a worm farm doesn't count Harry. Why is it sooooo hard for you to admit that you are WRONG? Fess up...you know NOTHING about hay or haying or hay equipment or how thieves steal it.
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On 12-06-2012 02:18, harry wrote:

I didn't own one; my father did. 250 acres; forty or fifty head of cattle; half the acreage in hay. I have operated hay balers that were brand-new and hay balers that were a hundred years old.
I have thrown straw and alfalfa bales with hooks and without.
They are pretty solid, but not as solid as wood. Unless you mean cork or balsa.
--
Wes Groleau

Change is inevitable. We need to learn that “inevitable" is
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And did you make big bales on your 250 acre farm? They are an entirely different beast.
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Bob F wrote:

Harry (being in the UK) is not familiar with the size and scale of farm fields here in north america.
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I know they are moved under cover as soon as possible to keep them dry.
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On 12/5/2012 11:45 AM, harry wrote:

Obviously, you don't have a clue. Most balers wraps the big bales with a waterproof material so they can be left out year around. They are moved out of the hay field but normally simply to an open area where the livestock cannot get to them.
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wrote:

With harry, that's a certainty

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Obviously, you don't have a clue. That is not hay in the black plastic, it is silage.
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wrote:

# # Obviously, you don't have a clue. That is not hay in the black # plastic, it is silage.
Damn, harry Are you a professional idiot ? Or do you come by it naturally ?
<http://www.tudorag.com/Haywrap.htm "Hay Wrap The Hay Wrap mounts on your tractor's 3pt hitch and uses its hydraulics to rotate the bale..."
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wrote:

Well done. Pity you never read it properly.
Though it's called "haywrap" it is for silage as it says further down.
Quote Bring the silage bales in with your regular bale mover and place them in a tight row. Spear the bales with the HayWrap machine, apply plastic (4 layers ). Place in the storage row with the HayWrap machine and RAM them very tightly together. This will expel any air and form a super tight seal. unquote
Usual standard of illiteracy I see.
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wrote:

# # Well done. # Pity you never read it properly. # # Actually, I did, and you didn' # More below # # Though it's called "haywrap" it is for silage as it says further # down.
And even furher down it goes on to talk abou dry hay
# # (PARTIAL) Quote # Bring the silage bales in with your regular bale mover and place them # in a tight row. <snip # unquote
And had you continued, Quote Wrapping Dry Hay: Traditionally dry hay was stored in the barn. Round bales significantly reduced the labor required for haymaking and reduced the capital investment of a storage building. However, outside storage results in dry matter loss and feed value loss. When both are calculated, total feed value loss can easily surpass 50%. With just 2 layers of plastic, the Hay Wrap machine protects and preserves your hay. END Quote
Poor harry The usual superficial git...
# # Usual standard of illiteracy I see. #
Indeed harry You found the word you so desperately wanted and stopped reading Next time try going down the page, you effing moron
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On 12/6/2012 12:52 AM, harry wrote:

Harry, are you trying to look even dumber than you really are or what? I didn't even mention black plastic and what we wrap in plastic (normally clear or white) is definitely hay and NOT silage!
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wrote:

It's called redirection A vain attempt to cover his gross and grotesque show of stupidity and ignorance. Although in harry's case that seems to be par for the course
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On Wednesday, December 5, 2012 1:02:27 PM UTC-5, IGot2P wrote:

Most?
Hell, most farmers just leave the bales right there in the field, wide open exposed to the weather. Only the "rich" farmers have wrappers.
There is some damage, but usually they just grind the whole bale up and mix the good in with the bad and feed to the livestock anyway.
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On Dec 6, 10:06pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How exactly do you grind up hay? Animals won't eat rotten hay.
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