amana washer belt shreds often... why?

Hi,
I own an Amana clothes washer, model CW8203W2, purchase ~9 years ago.
I never had a problem until about 3 years ago when the drive belt started falling apart. I replaced it with a stock replacement following the instructions in the Amana repair manual.
Last summer, I had to replace the belt a 2nd time.
Last week, I opened the front panel only to notice that the belt is again starting to fall apart. There are pieces of the material the covers the belt here and there in the washer, and there is rubber dust everywhere.
I'll be replacing it yet again in the next few weeks, but I was wondering if there is any adjustment required to ensure these belts last longer. What could be causing belts to fail so quickly?
Thanks for any insight on this.
t
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<< What could be causing belts to fail so quickly? >>
My vote is for rusty and/or misaligned drive pulleys. Replace the nasty ones, align and you should eliminate the shredding act. Good luck.
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca (r) wrote in message

Hi,
Some of the newer belts where bad for doing this, crappy belts....some washers may spin while agitating which is tough on the belt. Sometimes the idler pulley may be sticky and chews up the belt.
http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R 3&N460 Belt, length 32 1/2", width 1/2", characteristics, medium "v"- shaped, drive belt.
The idler pulley is suppose to keep the tension on the belt itself.

That is part of the model# info, Amana also uses a "P"# or "Man"# alone with the model#.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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What do you mean by a "stock replacement"?
Not a plain rubber automotive belt I hope. Many washers these days use special low-friction belts which can not be replaced with just any old belt.

Installing other than the factory replacement would be one cause, too much play in the idler or transmission pulley another. Maybe a deformation in one or the other as well.
Dan O. - Appliance411.com http://ng.Appliance411.com/?ref411=Amana+washer
=~~~~~~
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Me again,
The manufacturing no. is PCW8203W2A (with no space between 2 and A)
The replacement belt I use has part no. H40200A (don't recall actual manufacturer) which is direct replacement for part no. 28808 (same number of found on amana.com: item no. 28808 - BELT,AGITATE SPIN) available from a local appliance repair centre.
It isn't a 'plain rubber automotive belt'. It does have a V-shape (well, not really a V, since the inside of the belt is flat, not pointed, but the belt does have tappered sided) and is covered in some kind of cloth material, which is what rips and shreds first, after which the inside rubber section starts cracking. I'm assuming it is a low-friction belt with this cloth material covering the rubber.
I'll verify the drive pulleys as suggested for alignment/rust/wear. For alignment, I don't recall seeing this in the repair manual. Is it easily done visually?
Thanks, t

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I don't believe that is any type of alignment adjustment which can be made. Just make sure the idler pulley isn't teetering on it shaft and there isn't too much up and down play possible in the transmission pulley.
Dan O. - Appliance411.com http://ng.Appliance411.com/?ref411=Amana+washer
=~~~~~~

use
old
too
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I have a 5-year old Amana washer. It has gone through THREE belts. (And, no, I don't overload my machine.)
The last time, the repairmen found that the idler pulley spring had weakened. Too much slippage under high-torque conditions = burned belt.
Anyway, he told me its a good idea to make sure this spring is okay is you're having recurring belt failure...
My $0.02.
-D.

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<who knows?> wrote in message [...]

Thanks for the 2 cents, it's an excellent lead. I still have the original spring.
So in addition to checking the pulleys, I'll replace the spring at the same time as the belt. The part costs next to nothing and is real easy to replace. Who knows, I may have stretched it too much when I replaced the belt the 1st or 2nd time (or both?).
r.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/amana-washer-belt-shreds-often-why-511081-.htm thegrayguy wrote:
r wrote:

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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/amana-washer-belt-shreds-often-why-511081-.htm thegrayguy wrote:
These belt problems are usually due to excessive endplay in the input transmission shaft. You can verify this by taking the pulley off and pulling the shaft down. If you see any bearing wear marks there is too much endplay in the shaft. This is due to a poor design/manufacturing of the transmission. You could replace the transmission but it is probably better to get a new machine and if you do get a new transmission you just paid for the same old problem yet again. Amana will tell you the transmission is sealed. However, they put it together with bolts so it can be taken apart. I was going to get a new machine but I figured I could discard the old one apart as well as together so I would just go for it! The problem with this transmission is that the pinion gear has slipped on the input shafts gear spine.
To fix this have to take the washer apart. You can look up how to replace the tub seal for the procedure. There is a big counterweight on the drum so I would recommend that you get someone to help you with this and the reassembly. In addition, there is some messy and smelly gear lube to contend with so do this in the garage (and not in the kitchen). Once you have the drum out and upside down (and it is best to level it) and everything off so you can access the transmission, you take out the bolts and split the case (I used a screwdriver and a hammer) but be careful not to damage the machined sealing surfaces. I used a small hand vacuum pump to get most of the gear lube out of the top half of the transmission (and yes I did get some on the outer drum). You can then remove the input shaft from the lower case. Protecting the bottom spine with several layers of cloth lightly clamp the lower spine in a vice and remove the stud and washer that are supposed to hold the gear in place.
At this point you might want to check the gears and if they are in bad shape, scrap the washer. Mine were in great shape and had almost no wear even after 10 years of use. Check the brake assembly itself along with the other parts for wear. However, my machine ran at least 10 loads of laundry each week and all my other parts were just fine.
Next drive the pinion gear as far as it will go toward the center of the shaft (be sure to protected the end of the shaft with some rages and I used an old socket and a hammer to drive the gear). Next get in your car and go to a good (local) hardware store and purchase a spacer that will fit over the spine and not interfere with the gear teeth and between the gear serface and the washer that holds the gear in place. Make sure the spacer is thinner that the space between the gear and the surface of the shaft where the original washer mounts. Mine was 1/16 of an inch thick and cost me 50 cents. While you are at the hardware store, purchase some RTV and some new gear lube. (I paid $5.00 for the RTV. There were many brands that were cheaper, and $5.00 for the gear lube. I am not sure what the specs are for the lube (but I got the 70 weight). When you get home put your spacer between the gear and the original washer and reassemble the stud. Take your time cleaning up the old sealant especially in the sealant groves in the housing and do not get any of the old sealant inside the gear housing. Use some rages if needed. Next put the RTV on the sealing surfaces making sure to work the RTV into the seal groves. Next carefully fill the upper transmission housing with the new gear lube up to the sealing surfaces (being careful not to overfill and not getting ANY lube on the sealing surfaces). Put the input shaft and gear in the lower housing (you can put a little gear lube on the lower sleeve bearing if you want). You can then reassemble the transmission and the washer. You might want to lube the spines and the break assembly and replace the brake shoes, as it is easy to do so while you have them off. Also, of course, replace the belt.
My machine now runs great and makes much less noise than when it was new! I am wondering how many good washers and transmissions are in the landfills because they needed a 50-cent part. How much money did Amana make on replacement transmissions? Not to mention the bad repetition these machine have do this defect. Unbelievable!! The total for the repair was: Spacer $0.50, Gear lube $5.00, RTV-$5.00, Brake shoes - $25.00 Belt-$13.00 = $48.50. The washer will run another 10 years (hopefully). Time to figure this all out: About 1 sleepless night: Wifes happiness: Priceless!
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