Alternative to Muriatic acid?

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I'm in the process of working on my garage including filling in some cracks running through the garage floor.
My plan is to use self leveling cement to fill in the cracks and make the floor level.
I'm looking for an alternative to muriatic acid to clean up the garage floor and provide a stronger bond between the garage floor and self leveling cement.
Any thoughts?
Steven
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Muriatic acid is hydrochloric acid (HCl). It etches and cleans the cement you currently have. It is (or at least should be) easily rinsed off. Moreover, since HCl is a gas, it should really totally vanish when the floor is dry, aided easily with some ventilation. Doesn't your garage have a big door?
--
Best regards
Han
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My first thought -- indeed, my only thought -- is to wonder why you are looking for an alternative to *the* accepted standard method of cleaning and etching concrete prior to repairing it.
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On 8/15/2010 6:48 PM, BlinnPR wrote:

Vinegar, maybe but it will not etch cement like muriatic.
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The acid is to etch the concrete. If the concrete is "dirty" with oil or paint, these will shield the concrete from the acid.
Clean the concrete first with a "cleaner" appropriate to the "dirt" and etch only if suggested by product you plan to use.
I use powdered laundry detergent (Tide) to remove oily dirt, paint remover or mechanical means for paint. I acid etch for epoxy paint.
The product (or mfr of the product) you plan to use for leveling will provide (or should) prep instructions.
cheers Bob
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BlinnPR wrote:

Sulfuric? Nitric? If you happen to have particles of gold embedded in the floor and you want to remove them, use aqua regia (hydrochloric + nitric).
What's wrong with the hydrochloric (muriatic)?
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dadiOH
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wrote:

Have you forgotten all the Murians who were killed to make it?
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mm wrote:

They were a dying race anyway, they all had such acidic personalities :)
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dadiOH
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Why not use muratuc acid? What's your issue with it? Clean it first with a strong laundry detergent.
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BlinnPR wrote:

If you have a clean concrete there are bonding agents that can be added to concrete to aid in bonding to a previous surface. May or may not be appropriate for the self leveling cement you want to use.
Ask the self leveling cement manufacturer for suggestions?
--
bud--

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Yes, phosphoric acid is also used to etch concrete.
Hank
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But phosphoric acid isn't volatile, while muriatic acid is, so cleanup is more difficult with phosphoric acid.
--
Best regards
Han
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On 8/16/2010 12:18 PM, Han wrote:

My response was off the top of my head, but op could have simply googled and found such as this:

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Maybe you should check out the link below. You may want to re-evaluate your position on Phosphoric acid.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3q0QjqzIl3A

Hank
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Thanks! That helped the phosphoric acid cause.
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Han
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Han wrote:

paul oman
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On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 14:23:07 -0700 (PDT), "Hustlin' Hank"

hydrochloric or sulfuric. And the cleanup us more work. Mabee the Phosphoric I used wasn't as strong as the hydrochloric and sulphuric were. The big advantage to the sulphuric is the acid was free and we needed to get rid of it one way or other anyway. A big pile of batteries that needed to be shipped to the lead smelter netted in excess of 10 gallons of pretty strong acid.
The advantage of hydrochloric (muriatic) is it is available from any pool supply or hardware stoor.
Phosphoric hardly fizzes at all on normal concrete, while Hydrochloric and sulphuric really "get up a head of steam".
The phosphoric is definitely SAFER.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not if it's coming out of lead acid batteries. I wonder how much lead you put into the ground, or did you contain all the liquid and take it to a hazardous waste site?
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wrote:

I said Phosphoric is safer. Since when is battery acid phosphoric???
SHeesh!!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

For crying out loud READ!!!!! "The big advantage to the sulphuric is the acid was free and we needed to get rid of it one way or other anyway. A big pile of batteries that needed to be shipped to the lead smelter netted in excess of 10 gallons of pretty strong acid."
There is a salvage yard in ND that recycled batteries with the sulfuric acid dumped. They had to excavate a lot of dirt and send it to a haz disposal site.
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