Alaska Coal Stove Recalls

Can someone tell me how I can find out if there has been any recalls filed on any of the Alaska Coal Stoves.
Inside of my coal stove are 3, little nubs that help hold up the grate. The nub in the back has broken off with a clean break and is gone. Of course i f you try to shake the shaker the grate tilts and the entire bed, of hot co als, fall to the floor . . . End of fire-bed and heat.
I call snipped-for-privacy@juno.com asking for a repair appointment and a wee k later called again to tell them the gentlemen that lives in the house is home from his rehabilitation (from his hospital) stay at the nursing home, and why did not i receive the call back from them on the appointment. I wil lnot go into what happened after that, nor after my call to the Alaska "man ufacturer" in Bloomsburg, pa, but, what with the ridiculousness of the two conversations, I realized there was something BIG going on and that I was i n trouble. I always find it very difficult to have an adult conversation wi th good people that are bad liars.
Thereis a little, old (83), man spending his first morning home from the nu rsing home in a cold, lonely house. I sure hope his rehab. at the nursing h ome holds up better than the Alaska coal furnace with one, little, broken n ub (there are 3 of them), which helps to holds up the grate, a little nub t hat cannot be repaired, rigged, nor replaced.
I think the back nubs, that break, on these furnaces, also have some weight to bear, or interplay, for the end of the shaker. In other words theyare p ossibly under more stress than the ones on either side of the wall of the f urnace, but are of the same size, weight etc. as the little, side nubs. I f eel, this, then, is a defect and there should be a recall, and the buyer sh ouldnot have to bear the losses involved, lack of heat, hardship, expense o f the expensive "fix", not to mention the deceit and loss of time (consider ing the weather) which is actually an entire re-design of the entire grate system, costing bigtime.
Seems a hunk of iron should last a lot longer than 10 years.
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On Sat, 26 Sep 2015 07:43:10 -0700 (PDT), Shylock

What are the possibilities that a hole can be tapped and fitted with a stud or bolt (from the outside maybe) to replace the nub?

--
Mr.E

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Do you have the bird feeder in 1000 degree heat?
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The "glue" would be fine IF it was rated for expected temps. Otherwise I'd be looking at a "bolted" solution.
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On 9/26/2015 2:11 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Blue Magic 2400 degrees http://www.autozone.com/sealants-glues-adhesives-and-tape/epoxy-compound/blue-magic-qs-high-temperature-metal-repair-trilingual/515553_0_0/
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On 9/26/2015 10:43 AM, Shylock wrote:

Unless there are many stoves with broken nubs from a design or manufacturing error, there would be no recall. Unless there is a very long warranty, you are SOL.
Cast iron is not easily welded. I'd drill a hole and put a big bolt in place with nuts on both sides. A 3/8" would hold a bit of weight.
As for the longevity, no comment because I have no idea of what the design was and how it was used during those 10 years.
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