Air conditioning price

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In Pennsylvania a 1500 sq. ft. 2 story house. 26 years old. Gas heat pump installed now. How much would it cost to have a new heater & central air conditioner installed. Asking because i am thinking about buying this house & it doesn't have central air.
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wrote:

I don't have your answer, but look into potential tax credits. I've gotten numerous ads for different prices - all saying now is the time to buy new HVAC units. Our power company is also offering credits.
Worth looking into. My unit is 12 years old, so maybe a new unit is better and will save on the power bill.
One ad stated R-22 will become expensive soon and repair cost will go up drastically.
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Between $2,000 and $2,000,000. Start with your local contractor. Have them do the load calculations. If it has never had central air, it will be more, as they will have to put ducts that weren't put in the first place.
Asking a question like this is like asking what the weather is like tomorrow. Tomorrow HERE is 102. But, it may be different where you live. I know you want a good estimate so you know if you are being given a good price or being gouged. And that is smart, smart, smart, for an uninformed consumer like yourself. (Why else would you ask this in a newsgroup.) Sorry, Punkie. You have to do your own homework. Find your answers before someone hands you a pen.
Steve
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"SteveB" wrote

Steve, I guess it's possible to be only 1500sq feet and 2 stories. Kinda odd to me.

I wonder why he wants to replace the existing gas heat?

Grin, yup. I know some parts of his area use slab construction and you probably cant get ductwork through the floors for the upstairs.
He's probably gonna be better off with a roof unit for the upstairs and a separate one for downstairs.

Grin, he can have a few come in for estimates first and learn a bit.
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cshenk wrote:

Pretty common in that part of the country, more vertical than horizontal.

It's not really clear what exactly is there now, is it "gas heat" or a "heat pump"? Big difference there. No indication of the current delivery system either, FHA or hydronic, and a big difference there as well.
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Why odd? There are tens of thousands of houses like that in most any big city. I know of some 3 stories like that too. Ever check out row houses? Some are only 14 feet wide and less than 30 feet long, two stories plus a full basement.
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On Wed 26 Aug 2009 06:46:38p, Ed Pawlowski told us...

Not odd at all in many places. I have a friend in Ohio who bought a 3 story house in a rocky, hilly area of a woods. I think the square footage might even be slightly less than 1500, except for a greenhouse that is cantilevered from one side of the 2nd story. The 1st floor has a livingroom, small video/audio room and powder room. The 2nd floor has a kitchen and formal dining room. The 3rd floor has two bedrooms and a full bath.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

I see more and more houses like that built in the old neighborhood. So called in-fill houses. Narrow and long garage is usually in the back. I call it train house. Feels like inside passenger train.
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wrote:

houses. Seems to me a couple of window units should be able to handle such with ease.
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My house, stick built in [what was] rural NY in 1896 was originally 2 stories, 1200sq feet of living space, with a 'full' basement [for a short guy], and a full attic. It is pretty much the standard in this neck of the woods for the time. They've most all grown some since then.
Jim
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I grew up in a "row house" in NYC.
2 stories, full basement. 1100 sq ft not including the basement.
When we moved out it was bought by a family with this plan:
1 - Add a small kitchen upstairs to be the grandparent's living quarters. 3 small bedrooms and a full bath, so that's doable
2 - Add a bathroom on the first floor for the Mom, Dad and Daughter - Living room, dining room and a very small galley kitchen. I have no clue where they would put a powder room, nevermind a full bath.
3 - The future son-in-law would live in the basement until they married and then the daughter would move down there. - Doable, I lived in the basement for 2 years after returning from the service.
I'd love go back and see how they made out.
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cshenk wrote:

Pretty common. It is only until recent times that 4,000 sq ft became a "starter house".

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desgnr wrote:

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what if they want a second register installed?
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AZ Nomad wrote:

Add 43.98 for most types:-))
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wrote:

Would those be the 8" x 12", or the 12" by 8" size?
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

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wrote:

    Find a good local tech. Have them take a look at the house. There are big differences from one istalation to another. I would not trust any estimate made without a in person inspection first. In addition, you will want a good professional to do the work as the design of the instalation and the actural instalation is far more important than the hardware that is installed. No good installer is going to recommend second rate hardware.
    In other words, no one here is going to be able to offer you an accurate answer to your question.
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Get an HVAC company out and pay them for a service call to evaluate. THEN you will have something decent to run numbers with.
As mentioned, individual differences can make a big difference. Any part(s) of the existing system not evaluated/replaced, including ductwork, can significantly reduce the potential of all the new stuff.
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What is a "gas heat pump"? All the heat pumps I've seen have been electric.
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