After-market battery for Uninterruptible Power Supply -- one user's experience

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One of our APC UPSes started a continuous screech and flashing its red LED, indicating that the battery is dead. When I opened it up, I found that it was a replacement battery I had bought from Chrome Battery in Indiana in July 2012. IOW, it had lasted just two years, only six months longer than the warranty. A meter showed its voltage to be 13.64, but I assume that its internal resistance had become too high.
In its place I installed a battery that I had removed from a 6- or 7-yr-old CyberPower UPS, not because the battery showed any sign of problems but because I thought that a battery that old needed to be replaced. The APC UPS works fine with that replacement battery, which initially registered only 12.96V.
Whether that particular Chrome battery is a good sample of their (relabeled) products, I don't know: I do have at least one older one of theirs which so far seems OK. But this experience has got me wondering how after-market batteries in general compare with the ones installed by reputable manufacturers of UPSes and other devices. I think that every battery from an APC UPS that I've ever examined was made by CSB, and the ones that came from the CyberPower UPS are by "B.B. Battery"; the latter is definitely Chinese, and I think CSB is also.
In addition, under the "Chrome Battery" label that calls it a 12V 8.5AH battery, the manufacturer's (Leoch, also Chinese) own marking calls it a 12V 7.6AH battery.
Perce
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For what it's worth, I have an APC that lasted several years. Awhile back I ordered a replacement battery only because I figured it must be reaching the end of its life. APC shipped it with no trouble. Why would anyone buy a no-name replacement battery? If it's too much trouble to order a replacement you could just buy a new APC.
| One of our APC UPSes started a continuous screech and flashing its red | LED, indicating that the battery is dead. When I opened it up, I found | that it was a replacement battery I had bought from Chrome Battery in | Indiana in July 2012. IOW, it had lasted just two years, only six months | longer than the warranty. A meter showed its voltage to be 13.64, but I | assume that its internal resistance had become too high. | | In its place I installed a battery that I had removed from a 6- or | 7-yr-old CyberPower UPS, not because the battery showed any sign of | problems but because I thought that a battery that old needed to be | replaced. The APC UPS works fine with that replacement battery, which | initially registered only 12.96V. | | Whether that particular Chrome battery is a good sample of their | (relabeled) products, I don't know: I do have at least one older one of | theirs which so far seems OK. But this experience has got me wondering | how after-market batteries in general compare with the ones installed by | reputable manufacturers of UPSes and other devices. I think that every | battery from an APC UPS that I've ever examined was made by CSB, and the | ones that came from the CyberPower UPS are by "B.B. Battery"; the latter | is definitely Chinese, and I think CSB is also. | | In addition, under the "Chrome Battery" label that calls it a 12V 8.5AH | battery, the manufacturer's (Leoch, also Chinese) own marking calls it a | 12V 7.6AH battery. | | Perce
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For several years I simply bought new higher-capacity APC UPSes when they were on sale -- typically cheaper than a "genuine" battery from APC.
Now I see that "B.B. Battery" batteries (the brand that had lasted so long in the CyberPower UPS) are available for not that much more than the short-lived "Chrome" battery. They are claimed to last up to ten years in standby use (up to 250-300 charge-discharge cycles).
Perce
On 08/16/14 12:40 pm, Mayayana wrote:

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On 08/16/2014 11:16 AM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

To see if the battery has any capacity, just plug a lamp into the UPS
then pull the ac plug and see if it stays lit for a while.
Though gel cells typically last 4 years or so, I have a few UPS's here with batteries twice that age and they still have capacity.
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On 8/16/2014 12:16 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

As I understand, more AH just gives the unit more run time.
Has anyone tried wiring in a marine trolling battery? Both are 12 volts. The Walmart ones, I think were 85 or 115 amp hour (some thing like that). Would provide for a lot of run time.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 8/16/14, 1:33 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'm not accusing you of trolling, but if you were to suggest such a thing while heckling Drew Carey, I'm sure he'd tell you, "Army batteries are bigger, and anyone who says different is itching for a punch in the nose."
He's a leatherneck, you know, and a professional wrestler.
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On 8/16/14, 1:33 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-d-9nzH2KA

Sleeper cabs have used generators for sleeping because the run time and service life of conventional batteries were inadequate. A battery like the Oasis sounds dandy for a UPS.
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On 8/16/2014 2:54 PM, J Burns wrote:

Sounds like the best thing since sliced bread. I wonder if they are available? And how much they cost? http://fireflyenergy.com/
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On 8/17/2014 8:23 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

http://www.pjstar.com/article/20100313/News/303139893
Firefly Energy gives up battery business
Firefly Energy Inc. filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy Friday, and both the city of Peoria and Peoria County will likely pursue legal action to regain the $6 million the governments loaned the start-up in 2007. email print 0 By LAUREN REES Posted Mar. 13, 2010 @ 12:01 am Updated Mar 13, 2010 at 12:01 PM
PEORIA
Firefly Energy Inc. filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy Friday, and both the city of Peoria and Peoria County will likely pursue legal action to regain the $6 million the governments loaned the start-up in 2007.
County Board Chairman Tom O'Neill confirmed the company's bankruptcy filing. Ed Williams, Firefly CEO, could not be reached for comment.
The city and county guaranteed a $6 million loan to the company in May 2007. In a news release issued jointly by County Administrator Patrick Urich and City Manager Scott Moore, both said the city and county could lose their loan "in the worst case."
However, "in the likely case, the governments will pursue by legal means the pledged collateral, the physical and intellectual assets of Firefly Energy Inc., to reduce any investment losses that may be realized by the city and county," the news release said.
"The city and county intend to exercise their full rights to protect the interest of the tax payers of the city and county of Peoria," the release said.
Firefly also received a $7 million development contract from the U.S. government in 2007, followed by a $2 million grant from the U.S. military in 2008.
The high-tech start-up company was founded in 2003 by Williams and Mil Ovan, who was senior vice president. The company developed and manufactured a lighter, powerful lead-acid battery, replacing lead plates with graphite foam.
The company laid off 15 people in June amid the struggling economy, and Ovan left in February.
The two governments partnered to provide support to Firefly so the company would expand - and stay - in Peoria.
State Rep. David Leitch, R-Peoria, told the Journal Star before the loan was finalized that officials wanted Firefly to stay in the area. He said Friday he knew the company had been "close to some financial situation for some time," but didn't know what that situation was.
State Sen. David Koehler, D-Peoria, sponsored legislation in November expanding the Illinois Finance Authority's bonding authority for renewable energy projects. At the time, he told the Journal Star that Firefly could benefit from the law.
"It's a shame (Firefly filed for bankruptcy)," he said. "Last I heard, I talked to the CEO last year and they were very optimistic on some of their new technology," he said.
Nine CityLink buses installed Firefly's Oasis batteries in March 2009. Prototype Oasis batteries were also installed in four Freightliner trucks operated by G&D Integrated in Morton in late December 2008.
The batteries cost about $450 each, compared with CityLink's average battery cost of $146.
"Unfortunately, after three years of extensive efforts to make a commercially-viable alternative to the traditional lead-acid battery, Firefly has not been successful," the news release from the city and county said.
Read more: http://www.pjstar.com/article/20100313/News/303139893#ixzz3AeX2F5e7
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On 08/16/14 01:33 pm, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yes, more AH gives it more run time, BUT I have read that since UPSes typically don't have active cooling (fans), they depend on the battery running flat before everything overheats. So installing (or connecting externally) a much larger battery could cause the electronics to overheat and possibly catch fire.
Perce
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On 8/16/2014 4:04 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

When you figure out a way to install a marine, deep cycle battery in a UPS, I'll worry about overheating the electronics.<g>
I know (I think) what you're speaking of and I would never try to do the external battery routine on one of those little pukey lunch box sized UPS units. I suspect, however, that the larger ones would do okay with a deep cycle marine battery since there obviously would be more air movement/flow in the case without the sealed LA battery(s)
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On 8/17/2014 12:15 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Thanks for the tip about cooling. I'd have to check a UPS for cooling fan, before wiring in larger battery.
Anyhow, as to battery installation. You just take the E out of elephant, and the F out of weigh.
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On 08/17/2014 08:26 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

There ain't no effin weigh.
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On 08/17/2014 07:54 AM, straight man wrote:

Use the F in elephant, if you can find it :)
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On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 12:40:31 -0400, "Mayayana"

years, and I've had third party replaceents last over 3 years. Just replaced 2 that were installed in Mar 2011. They were CSBs purchaced from my local battery wholesaler. CSB are taiwanese batterie. I have a couple german Sonnenschein batteries, yuasas, and exides that are pushing 8 years. I refuse to waste my (and my customers') money on unknown brand mainland chinese crap batteries.
That said, I also don'r waste my money on APC standby UPS systems.
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On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 13:33:00 -0400, Stormin Mormon

might NEVER get them back up to full charge (and may possibly burn out) after a prolonged power outage.
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On 8/16/2014 6:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'd expect the float charger in a UPS would take about a year to recharge a marine trolling battery. So, I'd put on some kind of separate charger after an event.
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On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 17:04:17 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

"extended run" options and all of which I would feel comfortable running for 8 hours at a time - but I would want an external charger to recharge the ones that do not have "extended run" options. The non-extended run units are 48 volt, the extended runs are 54 volt. 700 to 1500 va output. 350 and 500 va standby units are only good for carrying you through "blips". I generally recommend a minimum of a "line interactive" like the 5 series Powerware units, and my main units are "dual conversion" units
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n Sat, 16 Aug 2014 12:16:03 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"

As a long time user of APC UPSes (and others) I've used many ABC replacement batteries from NewEgg or Provantage online stores. They are considerably cheaper and perform just as well. If you can find a source many of the batteries for electric scooters are the same and work equally as well but they're cheaper because theyre not intended for computers. Just my $.02 worth.
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On 08/17/14 09:30 am, BobMCT wrote:

Different operating conditions: scooter battery gets discharged and recharged frequently; battery in a standby UPS is charged and rarely (unless you have lousy power from your electricity supply utility) discharged. Battery internal construction is usually different for those two different uses.
Perce
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