Advantages of the metric system

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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote in

Even if you spell it wrong ;^)
In addition to the Imperial measurement system, Britain used the pound/shilling/pence system for centuries until 1971. 12 pence (d) = 1 shilling (/) 20/ = 1 (pound)
(I'm not seeing any 10's in there...)
So there were 240d per . Folks were very used to doing the arithmetic in their heads for counting and giving change, changing units as necessary. If they were given 37d, they knew immediately that they had "3/1", or "three shillings one pence", or "three and one".
Commerce did not stop -- or even slow down -- on account of the money system not being based on the numeral "10".
Maybe the Metric system is "easier", but it is hardly necessary for figuring out the childishly simple task of determining how many smaller boards you can get out of one larger board. Do you think the builders of Exeter Cathedral had trouble figuring out how to size the materials for that edifice, considering they had to do it all in Imperial?
--
Tegger

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On 10/04/2013 09:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Be careful when you sit on your bench the first time. Trex decking is not very strong.
> I was tired of having to replace the painted wood slats every few years as it is exposed to the weather.

Yes, the metric system is superior in every way.
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On 10/5/2013 1:12 PM, Anonymouse wrote:

Silly rabbit. Trex are for kids.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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I thought that there had been some legislation afew years ago mandating a c hange over to the metric system about a 10-year period. But that seems to have died.
As an electrical engineer, I have learned to think in more than one languag e/metrology system. I can convert lengths pretty much in my head. But wei ghts and volumes/measures still require me to stop and try to remember the conversion factors. The liquid oz and the volume oz still give me fits whe n reading something and I don't know the exact context so I don't know whic h the author means.
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On 10/5/2013 4:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

As a chemist, it would have been practically impossible to work in a lab encumbered by the English system.
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Does a metric centrifuge take 10 test tubes instead of 12?
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On 10/6/2013 7:43 AM, Mark Storkamp wrote:

Never thought about that. Would mean in the metric system, a car should have 10 wheels ;)
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On 10/06/2013 09:48 AM, Frank wrote:

A binary motorcycle has 10 wheels. ;)
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And the Can-Am Spyder has 11.
--
Tegger

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On 10/6/2013 10:20 AM, Jack Goff wrote:

There are 10 kinds of people in the world, those who speak binary and those who don't. The real weirdos speak BCD. O_o
Oh yea, check out this mono-cycle. ^_^
http://rynomotors.com/
TDD
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On Sun, 06 Oct 2013 14:48:50 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Wouldn't that be 1 kinds of people?
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wrote:

But a binary unicycle still has only 1 wheel.
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the metric system about a 10-year period. But that seems to have died.

system. I can convert lengths pretty much in my head. But weights and volumes/measures still require me to stop and try to remember the conversion factors. The liquid oz and the volume oz still give me fits when reading something and I don't know the exact context so I don't know which the author means.
Rule of thumb: when you're talking about water, ounces volume and ounces weight are interchangeable. The difference is less than four percent.
And if you needed higher precision than that, you wouldn't be using Imperial measurements for volume and weight anyway. <g>
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2013 18:57:28 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"

Works like this. Say your plank is 6". Your plank is 96/16. Your saw kerf is 3/16". Let's say you think getting 3 slats from that is about right. That's simple eyeball work, and your feel for what looks good. You'll lose 6/16 from the 2 kerfs. Leaves 90/16. Divide by 3. 30/16 is 1 7/8" per slat. Mark the plank, and cut there, with the kerf outside of your mark. Repeat. No scrap. You can get real close to same sized slats. If you need more precision, use 192/32 as you plank starting number. But getting anything to 1/32 precision is about the best you can do with a typical saw and that kind of material. It's not micrometer metal working. Doesn't matter at all if it's metrics or inch. You just have to be able to multiply and divide. They taught that in grade school when I was a kid.
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On Sat, 05 Oct 2013 20:10:21 -0500, Vic Smith

Right. Then forget the 16ths part. Just do the remember and do the arithmetic on the 96 and 3 parts.

I figured it out myself some time ago. It's not rocket surgery.
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^^^ THAT was my point.
--
Tegger

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Works like this. Say your plank is 6". Your plank is 96/16. Your saw kerf is 3/16". Let's say you think getting 3 slats from that is about right. That's simple eyeball work, and your feel for what looks good. You'll lose 6/16 from the 2 kerfs. Leaves 90/16. Divide by 3. 30/16 is 1 7/8" per slat. Mark the plank, and cut there, with the kerf outside of your mark. Repeat. No scrap. You can get real close to same sized slats. If you need more precision, use 192/32 as you plank starting number. But getting anything to 1/32 precision is about the best you can do with a typical saw and that kind of material. It's not micrometer metal working. Doesn't matter at all if it's metrics or inch. You just have to be able to multiply and divide. They taught that in grade school when I was a kid.
I agree that anything smaller than 1/32 is WAY down in the noise, but the e ngineer in me wanted the numbers to crunch perfectly. Anyway, the slats ar e cut, they look to the naked eye to be the same size, now I have to disman tle the old park bench with rusted-on nuts on the screws and clean things u p and reassemble it all.
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When I rebuilt a bench for my wife, I took one of the original slats, used it to set the fence on my table saw and ripped all the new ones in a matter of minutes.
I then used one of the originals to determine which router bit would make a matching round over and ran them all through the router table.
Then I drilled the holes for mounting them to the frame, again using an original slat as a template. I made a dipping tube from PVC pipe and used a piece of wire in the holes to dip them in stain and then hung them up to dry.
The old bolts were so rusted that I just snapped them off and replaced them. A pretty simple weekend project.
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On Sunday, October 6, 2013 1:29:15 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

engineer in me wanted the numbers to crunch perfectly. Anyway, the slats are cut, they look to the naked eye to be the same size, now I have to dism antle the old park bench with rusted-on nuts on the screws and clean things up and reassemble it all.
This thread reminded me of the day my neighbor showed up with several 1x4". Asked me to cut them in half. Couple 'about there' nicks on the saw, flo p/check and I had it. Cut them all. He returned shortly and said they are two narrow - he wanted them 2" wide!!.
I had to educate hime that a 1x4 is not 4" wide to start with and he also h as to allow for saw kerf.
Of course he is also the one who planted a whole row of saplings in his pas ture and wouldn't believe me when I told him the cows would eat them if he didn't fence them off.
And that was a country boy who had lived on a farm all his life.
Harry K
Harry K
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Now I need to bend two of the Trex pieces to make the curved armrests. I am hoping that immersing the precut (to length plus a little extra) armrests will soften up in boiling water so I can shape them.
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