Adding new bathroom in basement - electrical question


I'm adding a new bathroom in the basement, and the spot where it is is quite a far run from the service panel.
There are no existing circuits in that section of the basement that I would want to add the light, exhaust fan, and GFCI to.
Is it within NEC guidelines to run a separate 20 amp circuit to the bathroom, and run the light above the sink, the exhaust fa, and a GFCI receptaple on the same circuit?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Correct. A dedicated 20 amp circuit can be used to wire the entire bathroom, but only that bathroom. Of course, if you have things like a Jacuzzi , etc, you may need additional circuits

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The "loophole" for the code for baths is that the 20A circuit can serve the outlets in more than one bath, but only the outlets, not the lights or anything else. Just had this at my own house where we are adding 1 1/2 baths. The 20A circuit feeds from the upstairs full bath to the outlet in the 1/2 bath underneath it.
JK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It can be done two ways: One dedicated circuit can serve "one" entire bathroom, lights, fans, outlets, etc. or one dedicated 20 amp circuit can serve multiple bathroom receptacle outlets only, and the lights, fans, etc, can be run on whatever lighting circuits are available

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is what I had heard... All electrical for a "single" bathroom, outlet, light, fan, etc.
Cool thanks..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One 20 amp circuit for the gfci only.Check the NEC.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FYI : NEC 210.11 (C) (3) exception , spells it out very clearly

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
He/She can do it two different ways and still be in full compliance with the US NEC. One is a single twenty ampere circuit serves only the basin receptacle outlets in one or more bathrooms. The other is that the twenty ampere circuit can serve the receptacle outlet in one bathroom only as well as other loads in the same bathroom. Both approaches are allowed but you cannot combine them. I prefer to run one dedicated twenty ampere circuit to each bathroom basin receptacle outlet. Since the hairdryers that are used today take the entire ampacity of a fifteen ampere circuit to run them a second hair dryer would push a twenty ampere circuit over the trip point of it's breaker. If I do what the code allows and run two different bathroom's basin receptacle outlets from the same twenty ampere circuit then one hair dryer in each would trip the circuit. If the bathroom has auxiliary heat I use a multi wire branch circuit to supply the heater and the basin receptacle outlet. If future code changes require the use of AFCIs in bathroom circuits I'll just run dual circuit cable instead. Leaving at least one light in the bathroom on the general lighting circuit so that the tripping of a receptacle circuit will not plunge the room into darkness is my idea of good practice and common sense.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.