Add a bath to a slab house??

Naturally the only place I can add a new bath is the back of the house where we want to add a 15x40 addition.
The house is on a concrete slab and has a gravity feed to the city sewer system.
Hooking into the current plumbing would mean a LOT of concrete busted up and in places I don't want/can't bust up.
I've seen sewage ejectors that lift the waste to a higher elevation and allow a gravity feed to work. Is there anything for the an entire bathroom? toilet, shower, vanity bowl?
From the back of the home to the front of the home is about 60 feet so I wonder if an outside lateral addition would work????? maybe I can raise the throne up 6 feet? LOLOLOLOLOLOL
I know it would vary by county & city, but do you think a zoning board would allow a sceptic system in the rear of a house already serviced by public sewer?
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no septic but a lift pump will work fine. my in laws use a grinder toilet lift pump to service a basement bath where the sewer line leaves the basement barely underground
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"PirateBird" wrote

Yes, but IMHO this hits professional installers and isnt really a 'DIY' sort though you may be able to do some of it to cut the costs down. I'd get with an installer for an estimate before you design anything and start building.
Mom had to have something setup for that with a bathroom we added to a basement. I was too young to recall much details but there was some sort of pump thingie and a raised floor for that section for the pipes. Mostly I remember what a pain the raised floor was as my brother and I had to build that and we got it wrong (not high enough) so had to rip it out and start over.
I *think* the egress pipe to the sewer was about 3ft up from the basement floor? Maybe a bit less. We had to do a raised section all the way to that wall then there was a 'thingie' (pump I guess) installed. The bathroom just above the basement one, was rerouted to use that but I do not recall why. Possibly something to do with the venting? It was expensive work but it paid for itself in house value when we sold.

You could ask, but I imagine that would cost more to install than the pump unit even if allowed.
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into your own line for that matter). If you rent a trencher, they will usually dig at least four feet deep. Run your new line on the side of the addition to the front of the house and make a turn across your yard where you can meet your current line. You might not have the required elevation drop to meet the line at the house, but you may have it to meet your line in the mid point from your house to the city line or even at the city line. I replaced my main sewage line (on a slab) from the house to the city line and it wasn't that difficult.
Pat
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