AAA auto club

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On 11/22/2015 1:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

How about try and get back to us from the rehab and bone and joint center?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 11/21/2015 12:59 PM, Frank wrote:
[snip]

I've driven in Dallas TX, where the separation was more like .5 sec.
Changing lanes reminded me of parallel parking, but at 60 MPH.
[snip]
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"Mark Lloyd"

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wrote:

I wish more people knew this rule..... AND USED IT!
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On Sat, 21 Nov 2015 13:29:26 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

I hate tailgaters. IIRC, 1/4 or 1/3 of accidents involve them.
I've tried various things to get rid of them.
Waving my arm for them to go around doesn't work well. Even when the top is down and they can plainly see me holding my arm up and moving it in a circle. Even when I'm stopped on a residential street with enough room to go around me, and I'm waving, it takes most people a 10 or 20 seconds before they go around me. (In NYC it takes 1.2 seconds.)
Turning my head around and glowering at them doesn't work, I guess because I'm in such a hurry to look ahead again that they can't tell.
Turning on the 4-way flasher doesn't work, unless I slow down a lot too.
Turning on the right-turn signal works best. I think it calls up a conditioned reflex in them, because on an Xway, they could just wait until i change lanes to the right, which I don't plan to do, but they change lanes to the left pretty often when I put on the right-turn signal.
I suppose slowing down a lot risks gettins shot, but I dont' think that's happened in or around Baltimore.
Staying much farther behind than required has saved me several times, I guess when I'm not paying adequate attention, but stiill, it's saved me.
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What works best is turning the valve to drip used crankcase oil into the exhaust pipe (after the cat converter!).
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On 11/21/2015 1:36 PM, Micky wrote:

Yes, it can be set as you want and maintains it incredibly well even as the speed changes. If you slow down to 30, then 20, then come to a stop it will bring you closer and stop you at a normal distance.
First time I used it I was on a highway and was going to exit to another highway. I was following a car at 75 mph and he slowed on the ramp as it curved and accelerated a bit and slowed for the next curve and then accelerated back to 75. All I had to do was steer. I followed at a safe distance from 75 to 30 to 45 to 30 and finally back to 75.
The speed you set is the max, but it will slow you right to 0 if the car in front stops.
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That's good.
Sounds good. But all that steerring.
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On 11/21/2015 1:36 PM, Micky wrote:

In NYS, there is totally no way to maintain such a following distance. On the NYSTA at 60 MPH, other cars merge in front of you, at two car lengths. DAMHIKT.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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I always have a breaker bar with the proper socket for my lug nuts, in the car. I also carry some wood blocks in the car. And, a 30" piece of inch and a half diameter steel pipe. If a lug nut wont come off, the steel pipe on the breaker bar will usually get it off. If a jack dont go high enough, a wooden block will help (of course you should make sure the jack goes high enough, BEFORE you need it). And wooden blocks are also helpful for blocking the car on a hill, when you jack it up.
Those so called "Lug Wrenches" are too flimsy for stuck lug nuts. They will bend and flex, which means that NOT all your applied force is going to use on the nut.
I learned all these things the HARD WAY!!!
(And dont forget to check the air in your spare tire at least twice a year).
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On Sat, 21 Nov 2015 13:24:47 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

I've told this story before, but unless you changed your email, you weren't here.
We came back from our mother's and I dropped my brother off at Newark Airport. Got back from the terminal and I had a flat .
It was spring but I'd had surgery in December, couldn't drive, and the car was parked for two months in the snow, in Queens, and I'd not put one of the hubcaps on. On that wheel, the left rear, I couldnt' get the lug nuts off. I stood on the lug wrench, and got t hem off, but I broke 3 or 4 studs in the process.
It was Sunday. I could ave taken public transportation to NYC and then to Brooklyn, somehow found someone to tow in and fix my car in NJ, taken public transportation back on Monday. At least 5 hours wasted.
I decided to try driving home. About 15 miles. Going straight ahead and turning left worked okay. But when I turned right, the wheel went clomp, clomp, clomp. I tried to avoid right turns, or at least turn very gradually.
I'd either broken 4 studs, or I broke 3 and one more broke while I was driving. I got to the Holland Tunnel and hesitated. They really hate when you break down in the tunnel and they charge a lot to pull you out. They have a tow truck right there, that earns no money except when they tow people out, so that's another reason for them to charge.
I made it through the tunnel okay, and was going east on Walker, but just as I got to Broadway, the last lug stud broke, the wheel fell off, and the car's brake drum hit the ground, with the car not far behind.
I was in the left lane, probably legal then, but come Monday rush hour, 12 hours away, I'd be illegal.
So I jacked up the car, put the wheel on with no bolts, and started to drive. I got 2 inches. Did it again and got 4 feet. Did it again and went 140 feet, including turning left, going the wrong way up Broadway** and turning left over a curb and into a parking lot. ***
**Broadway south of Canal is really quiet on Sunday evenings, or it was when no one lived downtown.
***I'd scouted the area already and found this small parking lot, 120 feet north of the street I was on.
Took the subway home, came back the next morning with a hammer, a drift, and 5 new lug studs and nuts. It took under an hour to fix the car. I had to pay for 1.5 parking places for the whole day, because I parked at right angles to the parking places.
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On 11/21/2015 2:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Better yet, check to see if you have a spare. About a third of the new cars today have an air pump and sealer, no spare. Saves weight is the excuse.
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I don't like that. There go my plans to buy a third of a new car.
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On 11/21/2015 11:03 PM, Micky wrote:

Mostly is is the compacts and lower end cars with no spare, but you can buy one and have it added. It would be a shocker to find an air pump when you are 120 miles from civilization and a cut sidewall.
I went for about 20 years not ever needing the spare, but sure glad I had one when I needed it.
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wrote:

There's an article here from about a year ago. (Greenville Online) http://tinyurl.com/nsgklcy People have flats on their cars about once every 70,000 if I understood the Michelin exec correctly. It didn't sound like cars and such are their next target market for the tweel. The exec talks about putting these tires on ATVs next. The obvious problem with that would be mud getting into the tires and drying or freezing into them. It's good that these online conversations wander. One can learn all sorts of odd stuff. Political arguments can get super heated and no one will likely lose out in real life due to it.
-- Using Opera's mail client: http://www.opera.com/mail/
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A lot of good that pump and sealer will do if a tire completely blows and shreads as you come to a stop.....
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On 11/21/2015 2:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

2) When they say to recheck torque on aluminum wheels, they mean it. Need to retorque the lugs after about 25 miles, and I do it again at 50 miles of driving after changing a wheel for any reason. 2a) Carry a torque wrench and socket. 3) If a wheel is making a thumping noise after a home brake job, pull over. Remove the snap cap and retorque the lugs. Else your wheel will get more noisy until it falls off. DAMHIKT. 4) If you get to use a X shaped lug wrench, lean your left hip against the car. Pull up by hand on the right side of the wrench, use your foot to push down on the left.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Sun, 22 Nov 2015 08:18:04 -0500, Stormin Mormon

like used on most steel wheels and most OEM alloys I have yet, in over 45 years, to find one where the torque changed if properly torqued in the first place. The old "shank" style nuts with flat washers etc? You bet they can change torque. I would never use the on my car for that reason (and more).
Good alloys, with steel conical inserts, are every bit as stable, (if not moreso) as the typical stamped center steel wheel.
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On 11/22/2015 1:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've had two wheels (well, maybe more) loosen in the first few miles. Both in the last two years. My nuts have tapered ends, and wheels have tapered seats.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Sun, 22 Nov 2015 16:26:51 -0500, Stormin Mormon

torque sequence? If you did, they would NOT loose torque. Virtually impossible.

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