A Source for Classic AT&T J-Shaped Wiring Nails


Does anyone know of a current source for the classic, j-shaped wiring nails that AT&T used in the 1950's? They are made from ~ 3/32" wire. The opening that gripped the phone wire is ~3/16" square. The overall length is 7/8". The outside measure across the "J" is ~ 3/8".
For some applications, these old nails are far less obtrusive than the now commonly available plastic/box nail ones.
I've searched all the terms I can concoct and I've either had too many false hits or no hits at all.
Thanks,
baumgrenze
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They were used virtually exclusively for affixing GROUND WIRE, not inside station wire.
The old, three-conductor "bridle" wire or "JK" was attached using a little wooden cleat with a short nail at each end. I've been pulling this stuff out and throwing it away for 25 years.

Fer pete's sake, get an Arrow T25 staple gun, some 7/16-inch staples and develop a good stapling technique.
Those staples that you inadvertently seat a bit too deep, simply back out (loosen one leg) with your dikes. Those that are too loose, remove and try again.
I've stapled A LOT of the old wire, and speaker wire, and other stuff not generally recommended to be affixed with a common, uninsulated staple and have never had a problem. I could see an increased potential for future trouble if affixed in an area subject to vigorous vibration but, above a drop-ceiling, for example, no problem. Good luck.
--
:)
JR

Climb poles and dig holes
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Another trick is to staple a common ty-rap to the mounting surface, then use the ty-rap to secure the wire. This protects the wire from ANY assault by an over-zealous staple gun operator. A common household/shop stapler works just fine for this.
--
:)
JR

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Jim,
Thanks for your reply.
I should have been more specific about the esthetic issue. The exterior of my house is a vertical 'board and batten' pattern of 3/8" x 5/16" grooves on 2" centers in 5/8" plywood.
When AT&T made the original installation they used the J-shaped nails for everything. They work especially well for installing POTS wire in the grooves. I've replaced some, e.g, the line to the DSL modem, with Cat3 cable, but that, too, is ~ the same diameter so it also fits the grooves.
If anyone knows, I'm still interested in how to specifiy the J-Shaped nails so I can search for them. Do they have a name that might let me find a source?
Thanks,
baumgrenze
Jim Redelfs wrote:

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I'm sure they do, but I don't know it, or have forgotten it.
I was going to offer to ask some of the old guys at the fone company then remembered that, after 33 years, I'm it. <sigh>
Still, there are techs still working that have 5-1/2 years MORE than me OUTSIDE while working there. I'll ask around. Don't hold your breath.
It wouldn't surprise me that they have gone the way of the buggy-whip.
What you ought to do is carry a nail with you in your coin purse and ask around when you seen an old telco guy or electrician-type at a Burger King, for example. Good luck!
You can be sure there's countless THOUSANDS of them that, over the years, have spilled on the floor and been kicked under the bottom shelf of countless telco stockrooms - and they are still there! (sorry)
--
:)
JR

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Jim,
Thanks!
Way too many things that are far more useful than buggy whips have joined them on the dust heap of time. :(= (I have a beard.)
John
Jim Redelfs wrote:

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