75w bulb in 60w socket?

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Sammy,

The biggest danger is heat. 75 watt bulbs put off more heat than 60 watt bulbs do. While this "might not" be a problem, it is possible the excessive heat could damage the fixture and/or the wiring. Especially with a fixture that encloses the bulbs within a globe or cover.
Most light fixtures also require your house wiring to be rated for higher temperatures (i.e. the newer NM-B instead of the original NM type). I have seen the insulation on older wiring get brittle from too much heat and break away from the wiring, leaving exposed conductors that could touch and start a fire. However, it's probably not an issue for a ceiling fan which has the bulbs located a fair distance from the house wiring.
In simple terms, you could probably put the 75 watt bulbs in and not have any problems. But is the extra bit of light really worth the risk of burning down your house? It's like putting a larger fuse in a circuit when the correct size blows. You might get by with it for years, but it only takes one time for the wiring to overheat and start a fire. Just because you can, doesn't mean you should. Follow the manufacturers recommendations.
One option is to replace the 60 watt bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs. You can find bulbs rated for the equivalent light output (lumens) as a 75 watt bulb, but they use far less power and put off very little heat. It's a great way to conserve energy, and safely increase your light output at the same time. However, the fluorescent bulbs are even more sensitive to heat, and may burn out prematurely in an enclosed fixture. The only real problem with that is cost. But it probably wouldn't be a big problem for an outdoor fixture that is only used occasionally.
Anthony
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Any reasonable way to make air-holes in existing glass-enclosures?
That would somehow avoid concentrating existing frozen-in stress in the glass, and thus would be safe?
David
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Assuming you are talking about a 1-piece glass globe, no, there is no good way to drill a hole in it. If it is a frame with panels, you can make cracks for air. Glass breaking isn't the risk- overheating and disintegration of the cheap socket, feed wires, and base insulation is the risk. I've had to replace fixtures where all the electrical parts were scorched brown and crumbly from the heat.
These types of light fixtures are pretty cheap- if you need more light than the fixture is rated for, just change it out for a bigger or better one.
aem sends....
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sammy wrote:

Try those 17w or 23w spiral fluorescent lamps. They are getting pretty good -- as long as there's no dimmer.
Bob
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Compact fluorescent is the way to go... cooler and last longer, more $$ though, but in the long run probably saves $$.
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But may not be as pleasant for reading as incandescent -- one could look at an evaluation here -- http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_journal/home_improvement/4215199.html
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If the lamp sockets are ceramic (china-like) material you may get away with it. If the sockets are plastic/bakelite material would not recommend it. Even at the 'rated' wattage non-ceramic sockets often crack and deteriorate in my experience. In fact I would even de-rate- to 40 watt bulbs unless the fixture sockets are nice and open /well ventilated. However for a few dollars you can usually rebuild a light fixture with ceramic sockets. Probably cost you around ten bucks? As others have suggested you could try non-incandescent lamps (CFLs for example.) My opinion.
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I would say there's a danger if the manufacturer took the time to put a warning on there. What I have seen on a lot of fixtures is a piece of adhesive foil foam above the light, or where the light comes close to anything. I'd just buy a safer higher wattage fixture and be safe.
I have used 75's and 100's in sockets for 60's but didn't feel safe with them.
Steve
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The manufacturer put the warning on; but did so after passing a UL test which sets upper limits to lamp wattage based upon fire and electrical safety. The UL tests consider socket temperatures, deterioration of wire insulation and the life of the materials used in the fixture assembly. Exceeding the wattage limit voids the UL listing.
TKM
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And just exactly what happens when one voids the UL listing? Do you get a notice? Do the UL Police send a guy by?
Steve
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 08:30:28 -0700, "Steve B"

Yes, and you don't want to spend time in a UL interrogation room.

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VOIDS THE UL LISTING!!! That sounds very serious. I thought it would do something simple like start a fire.
Steve
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On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 08:33:40 -0700, Steve B wrote:

Been using 75 watt bulbs in two, two bulb mirrorside vertical light bars for 16 years with no evidence of damage to the Bakelite bulb bases. And I'm certain these fixtures are at least 25-30 years old. Guess they just don't make em like they used to.
--
#1 Offishul Ruiner of Usenet, March 2007
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I've seen a lot of old fixtures where there was discoloration due to heat, and don't think there's a very high degree of danger.
When thinking of things engineering wise, I always extrapolate to the nth degree. Like, what if someone would put in a 2,000 watt bulb? Sometimes it makes the visualization of the math and algebra and angles and leverage simpler so that one can comprehend "If I do this, that happens, and if I do that, this happens."
I, myself, like to stick to the 60w bulb in a 60w rated receptacle, but will go against that in cases where I need more light, or the 100s are on sale.
Steve
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Check the fixture wires for brittle, damaged, flaking insulation before you decide anything about the degree of danger. It's not just the socket you need to worry about.

If you've been in the habit of using 100W bulbs in 60W rated fixtures, I strongly recommend that you examine the fixture wires for damage. You might be surprised (and appalled) at what you find.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Never mind the sockets -- what about the fixture wires?
Don't do it.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Please listen to Doug and don't do it. Especially not in something that you won't look at for extended periods of time like a porch light.
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Come off the light-fixture box to two additional lights, with their own switch loop. Then you can turn on the reading lamps only when you actually want them.
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Should have a porcelain socket for 75 watt, or at least one rated for 75 watt. A plastic one may melt. Best not to exceed the max rating sticker on the socket.
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I am using 2 100w equivalent Daylight CF's in my office and it is quite nice. The fixture is rated for 2 60w incandescent bulbs. It takes less than a minute to reach full brightness.
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