75w bulb in 60w socket?

Page 1 of 4  

hi,
we have an outdoor ceiling fan with a glass globed light kit in our screened in porch. it takes two light bulbs. the owners manual says to use 60w bulbs.
the 60w bulbs don't throw quite enough light for reading out there at night. is there any danger in my using 75w bulbs instead of the 60w bulbs?
thanks,
sammy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It will build up more heat inside the globe, thus heating up the socket and wires more. . Danger? Minimal, but I'm not going to give you permission to use an over rated bulb.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 00:09:06 -0400, sammy wrote:

Try 75 watters, if the globe feels too hot then the answer is no. Or you could buy a pole lamp and position it near you just for reading.
--
#1 Offishul Ruiner of Usenet, March 2007
#1 Usenet Asshole, March 2007
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
maybe try a florescent (spelling?) bulb..
if it fits.. and you don't mind the color.. it will generate far less heat

screened
bulbs.
night.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 22:33:34 -0600, "Coloradotrout"

Hey CT, You really in CO? Me too. High in the rockies.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Practically speaking, no. They do make newer bulbs that put off the same number of lumens as older 75 watt bulbs, but consume less energy. So you really can't use that rating exactly anyway. It's a guide that puts you safely in a zone. But it's not an exact thing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 01:01:16 -0400, jeffc wrote:

If the globe is enclosed 100% I won't ever say yes to a third party. If open then speaking from experience and the lack of burning down my house it would be ok. Most if not all lamp fixtures are rated at 60 watts. I have a Hunter fan in my bedroom rated at 60x2 and have 75x2 inside in an enclosed globe. Granted I don't use it at full power all the time I feel quite safe 10 years going.
--
#1 Offishul Ruiner of Usenet, March 2007
#1 Usenet Asshole, March 2007
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've used 75 and 100 watt bulbs in tthe white globes that are sold for kitchen and hall lights, maybe 6?inches. It wasn't clear that they were burning out faster. All the bulbs in my house seemed to burn out fast, but after 20 years of this, 2 of the 3 kitchen sockets were damaged. The outer plastic (brown bakelight or plastic) had broken off 2 of them and 1 of them doesn't have a good connection with the wire. I'm replacing it. The hall lights didn't suffer near as much, partly becasue sometimes I used a 60, or 75, and partly because I don't run those lights near as much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It may well be true that I used nothing but 60's for the first 10 years out of 20. It might be that I finally decided I didn't have enough light and started using bigger bulbs.
And it probably didn't take the full 10 or 20 years to damage the sockets. They've been chipping off for years, and finally one is missing all of its plastic on 50% of the circumference. Of course I also used 100 watt bulbs sometimes.
I have a whole new fixture to put in, which is attractive and uses neon bulbs, but before I got it in, I saw the same fixture at a friend's, and he had taken it out saying it didn't give enough light! Dang. My new one has two U-shaped neon bulbs, at least two-feet long, or a totat of 5 feet per bulb. I'm hoping it will be brighter than say 250 watts of incandescent.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sammy wrote:

no
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then why isn't the fixture rated for 75 W bulbs?
While _probably_ minimal chance, certainly isn't _no_ increased danger of overheating. Remember there are two, not just one, so it's really rating the globe at 120 W vis a vis 150. I suspect the biggest limitation is the globe, but if OP is going to use larger bulb, at least make sure they're of the higher-efficiency type...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

That may be true, but enough tolerance is built in to handle that slight heat difference. I actually should not have said to stray from the manufacturers recommendations. My error in retrospect.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm *sure* it's true, on several counts: first, I *have* seen that damage, and second, I'm quite sure you have *not* seen it, or you wouldn't suppose that there is no harm in exceeding the recommendations.

Guess again. That's why the manufacturer puts limits on there. If there was enough tolerance to handle 75W safely, the socket would be marked 75W instead of 60W.

There you go. They put those recommendations there for a reason.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D'Amico wrote:

I once saw a "banker's lamp" style desk lamp rated for 60 watt bulbs and that had the wires produce a burning ofdor and visibly char to a dark brown color within 10's or hundreds of hours with a 60 watt bulb. I suspect it was tested with a bulb having a vacuum (if it was properly tested at all) and the lamp apparently came with a gas filled bulb. The bulb was a refrigerator/showcase style tubular one, and 120V bulbs of that style and up to 40 watts normally have a vacuum.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
newsgroup with:

try using a non-frosted (e.g. clear) 60w bulb first. They give a a LOT more light at the same wattage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
graced this

Nope. The light output (lumen) rating of clear and frosted bulbs is about the same (within a percent or two). Clear bulbs are more glaring, however, because you can see the bright filament.
TKM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Could go w/ an A19 bulb instead of A15, however, and get roughly 25% more initial lumens at the same wattage (assuming the fixture will accept the larger size).
See GE comparisons at
http://genet.gelighting.com/LightProducts/Dispatcher?REQUEST=COMMERCIALCOMPARE&CHANNEL=Commercial
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Be careful ---- excessive heat could cause the wires to degrade. And if by chance a fire starts and they see the different wattage, your insurance could be void.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 13:18:22 GMT, "Jacque Asse"

homeowners insurance doesn't work that way. They won't "void" a policy just because of owner stupidity.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
graced this newsgroup with:

Perhaps, but that doesn't mean they have to pay when something goes wrong.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.