#6 wire question--

I have to move my stove to the other side of my kitchen for a couple of weeks due to construcion. It is electric, and from what I can tell, 220v extension cords don't exist. .
I plan to disconnect the 220v wall plug, wire in a 20 foot jumper section of #6 cable, then re-attach wall plug to end up jumper. Will run temporary wire under kitchen floor/on basement ceiling.
My questions is this, are there #6 wire nuts, or so you use a different technique to connect #6 wire?
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YES, they are normally Large Blue with wings, they look like wing nuts. Home Depot should carry these for you. Also lots of guys have 220V extention cords that are used for generators and wleding etc. Maybe if you have either of these you can make one up.
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Jack wrote:

You can use #6 wire nuts. The splice must be contained within a junction box. Make sure that the temporary wiring you use meets code (i.e. NM mounted correctly, BX, in conduit, etc.)
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it will be a hassle, i would eat out for a couple weeks or use a hotplate or my favorite cook on grill while kitchen is down for repairs....
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Travis Jordan ( snipped-for-privacy@no.net) said...

There are also cable splicing kits available. They contain brass splices and heat shirink tubing.
The splices are sections short brass tubing with a set screw at each end. You place a section of heat shrink tubing over one wire, insert that wire into one end of a splice and tighten the screw. Insert the other wire into the other end and tighten its screw, then slide the heat shrink tubing over the splice and heat gently to shrink the tubing.
These kits are usually certified for splicing a cable that is underground, but within a building the splice must still be in a junction box.
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You make them.
For longer term use, you'd buy something like 4 wire Sxxx or SJxx cord (stranded flexible heavy or medium duty), and buy the appropriate plug to match the existing socket. Often, you buy and install a matching socket into a box for the other end of the cord.
These things ain't cheap tho. The plug runs around $15, and depending on a variety of things, you could end up paying more than that for the socket. 4 wire #6 Sxxx cord could run over $3/foot. I spent almost $50 making up a 15' 240V (3 wire) 40A extension. You might have to spend about twice that.

As others have mentioned, there are suitable wirenuts. The package should list exactly what combinations of wire are permitted.
A 20' length of #6/3 is going to be a lot cheaper than making up a 20' "extension cord". As long as the #6/3 can't get kicked out of the wall (which it sounds as if it can't), and you have a reasonable grounded and protected socket at the stove end, this works fine, and inspectors won't bitch.
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