3/4" and 1 1/8" sheet rock screws?


Awl --
Yes indeedy!
Apropos of the thread on nails vs screws, I thought I'd mention this. In both fine and coarse threads. Most people aren't aware of this, because 1 in 100 suppliers carry these.
The 3/4" really come in handy, so's they won't poke through countertops, etc. You might have to beg and grovel to get your supplier to order a box of each, but they will sell. Proly can find them online, as well, and mebbe even some other odd lengths.
--
EA



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wrote:

Why go to that trouble when you can get easily get other screws in almost any length?
The countertop example isn't the best one - I'd use some 3M 77 spray adhesive and not have to worry about poking through. Very handy stuff, that. R
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RicodJour wrote:

the cabinets. Not a fan of glued-down counters. If I was doing production work on cookie cutters where getting it done fast was important, I might feel differently.
Always try to think of the poor SOB 20 years from now, stuck with taking apart what you put together. Make things removable, write notes inside enclosures, label connections, etc, etc.
-- aem sends...
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Heh, you certainly could not have been brought up in Merka! Or you are a really old-timer with really old values. :)
--
EA

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You must have missed my other thread where I was ripping someone a new one for not providing for the people who came after. That is not the issue here. A countertop - least every countertop I've ever seen/ built - is 1.5" thick, not 3/4", so the thing about the screw length is a non-starter. My example of the spray adhesive for the countertop was for attaching blocking and such to the 3/4" countertop blank - assuming you're building it up yourself. And as I also mentioned, there are readily available screws, superior to drywall screws, that would obviate the need to go hunt down an oddball screw.
Frankly, I'm not sure what you're getting at. Subfloors are glued down now - didn't use to be the case. Working on a nailed subfloor was a lot easier, but people basically decided that the strength and squeak free advantages outweighed the disadvantage of disassembling the floor at a later date.
I do agree that allowing for the next guy is a sign of respect and care in someone's work - both to the homeowner and the person who will be doing the work.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

'spray adhesive'. As to subfloors and such- IIUC, modern engineered joists require the decking to be glued down as part of the design parameters. I understand that- makes the floor into a unit section and all. I see no problem with gluing that together. Now, if somebody said to glue down the underlayment over the subfloor, I'd cringe a little. Figuring on a decent house lasting at least 100 years, you can expect that the part above the subfloor would need to be refreshed at some point.
-- aem sends, trying not to keep pondering the house he'll never be able to afford to build his way....
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re: Make things removable, write notes inside enclosures, label connections, etc, etc.
When I removed a knee wall to install shelves with sliding doors, I had to create a flat surface for the upper tracks.
I cut triangular blocks and attached a vertical face plate and a horizontal piece for the tracks, basically building a triangular soffit. Here's a bad side view:
----------- / < -- Slanted section of ceiling / /| / | <-- Face of soffit / | -------| ^^ ^^ Tracks
Before attaching the face plate, I had a number of small "cubbies". My kids were like 10, 8, 6 and 5 at the time.
I had each of them, and my wife and I, write and/or draw something on a sheet of paper, which we dated and stuck into the cubbies, which were then hidden by the face plate.
Hopefully, many years from now, we'll make some other family smile, should they decide to redo the room, raise the roof, whatever.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Chuckle. Old building/remodeling tradition. In the early 1970s, I participated in the remodel of a couple detached brick 'brownstone' type buildings from the 1890s. In the dead spaces in the attic, we found all sorts of vintage 'kilroy was here' type grafitti. In working on one of the cookie-cutter houses my mother owned for awhile, found all sorts of inscribed 1966 pop cans in the crawlspace and attic. I always added my initials and date when pouring footers for crawlspaces. Pencil on wood, or inscriptions on metal or stone, outlast paper, especially in hot or wet areas.
-- aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:

20 yrs from now the glue will have let go and all you have to do it carry the countertop out. Screws would be rusted and a big pain in the ass. I vote glue. A rap or two with a hammer and it's popped loose.
s
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Your proly right.Mebbe I will get some.
Thanks, Red [proud grajewate of the Evelyn Woodhead sped ridin course]
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The shorter sizes do come in handy; however, I always use 1/4" hex for countertops.
They are a whole lot easier to keep on the end of the tool when working one handed.
Colbyt
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