200 Amp Service, Tankless water heater

Page 1 of 3  
I live in Connecticut. My house currently has 100 amp service. I want to switch to a tankless water heater. I have since learned, from a contractor whom came to my house, that I will need 200 amp main service; plus the cost to install the WH.
I was quoted a cost between $1.5 to $2k, for the 200 amp upgrade. Is that a reasonable cost?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 8:54:04 AM UTC-4, Dave C wrote:

Without knowing more it doesn't sound totally out of line, but if the main purpose of the upgrade is to support an electric tankless, unless you have some special application need, you must be nuts. At least $1500 plus the cost of the tankless?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I always thought the same myself. If installing the 200 amp service is only for the water heater, it will take a lifetime to notice that kind of savings.
I worked in a verly large plant and at one sink they decided to install a tankless water heater. Had it all plumbed in and then they checked on the wiring. They would have had to run about 500 feet or more of new wiring in conduit just to power that heater. They tore it out and put in a small water tank that could use 120 volts that was only about 50 feet away.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
but if

+1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I paid $1100 for that service upgrade in 1998. Northern Illinois. It was permitted and inspected. I considered it a good price. I found the price can vary by quite a lot. Get a number of estimates. As long as it's inspected, go for the low bidder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/26/2015 10:19 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

Wow. I can't say what the norm is but that seems steep to me.
I had a 100 amp upgrade about two years ago which cost me $300. I don't know what the difference is other than higher amperage, but the breakers, box and all are still the same. Perhaps it's more about demographics and/or supply and demand in those areas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Meanie wrote:

I installed a 200A panel in the house we're building . When the Entergy guys came out to move the service from the "trailer/camper service" to the house they used the old 100A wire from the pole . Told me that when I have need of more amperage , such as installing central AC , they'd be back to replace it with 200A wire . For free . I suspect most of that money is going into the electrician's pocket ... in this area license and inspections are nonexistant except for commercial and in town , we live out in the county in a clearing in the woods . Doesn't mean I'm going to cut corners though , doing it right is just as easy and costs the same .
--
Snag



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

You seem to be talking about the electric utility company part of the job, not the part that an electrician would do to upgrade from a 100-amp service to a 200-amp service. That is not what the OP is asking.
And, if you have a 200-amp service panel with a 200-amp main breaker, how is it possible that the electric utility company would be will to run a service drop to your place with a wire that is only capable of handling 100 amps (and not 200 amps)?
.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TomR wrote:

Because it is pretty obvious I haven't got anything that draws that much .The upgrade is just a phone call away when I do have need of the increased capacity . -- Snag
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

I understand what you are saying. However, (and I may be wrong about this) I think of the main breaker as a device that protects the wire that is coming into the main panel.
I would think that an oversized main breaker would not be permitted by the utility company if the breaker size was not suitable to protect their wire coming in. Or, to put it another way, I would think that a utility company would not be willing to connect a wire (theirs) that is only rated for 100 amps to a main panel with a 200 amp main breaker.
You seem to be saying that they know that you are not planning on using more than 100 amps at any time, unless you notify them in advance of that, and give them time to increase the service drop wire size. I am just surprised that any electric utility company would be willing to do that.
But, hey, you seem to be saying that's what they are willing to do. And, I have no reason not to believe you. It just seems odd to me, but that doesn't mean that's not how it is out there in some places.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

cable. If he draws over 100 amps he will lose power and will have to call the power co in to replace the fuse and the overhead cable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:31:48 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The power company does not give a rats ass about their cable. The only overcurrent protection is on the primary to the transformer and for the user, that means the available fault current is 22ka or more in most cases. For all extents and purposes, service conductors have ZERO over current protection. That is why the rules are so much tougher about how they are run.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can't speak for all of the utilities but FPL runs the exact same triplex for 100a as they do for 200a and it is ~2ga aluminum. When I heavied my service up from 100 to 200 they said the overhead was fine but I had to run a 4/0 down to the meter and through the wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 17:29:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In a 40 year old subdivision, 100 amp was "normal" and updating to 200 amp requires total cable replacement.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Mar 2015 19:42:13 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This house was built in 1963 and they has 100 in it when I bought it in 84. The #2 triplex is pretty much what they install for everything up to 200a.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

+1
Same for PECO.
--
Tekkie *Please post a follow-up*

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

with a 100 amp breaker, or a 100 amp breaker needs to be installed "upstream" - like at the pole.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In wrote:

For that price, you must have already had the right size service coming into the property along with the right size service panel etc. Since you said that the "breakers, box and all are still the same", did they just change a 60-amp main breaker to a 100-amp main breaker in the existing panel?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With an overhead service, you are usually only responsible for the SE cable/conductors going up the side of the house and through the wall. Some utilities will even give you the meter can. The wild card is what you have to do to your existing panel. You can put in a grounding bus, lift the bonding jumper, swing over the grounds and run in a 4 wire feeder from a 200a meter/main and then run your new loads from that main. This seems to be a pretty popular option. The big labor hog is swapping out the existing panel because you may end up with wires that are too short, perhaps space problems where it is mounted and then that unknown that always pops up. That might also trigger the requirement for AFCIs in some jurisdictions and that can really pop the top on that can of worms.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.