200 amp main panel with 100 amp breaker

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On Tue, 27 May 2008 05:39:42 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

I see a couple of possibilities. First do a load calculation and see if upgrading to 150/200 is really the way to go. Swapping the panel is the big part of an upgrade. If you do decide 100a is plenty you can get a 40 slot MLO panel and install a backfed 100a breaker (assuming you can't find a combo with enough slots that already has the 100). Usually 100a panels are 20 slot but some are 20/40 using piggyback breakers. That doesn't help much if your problem is AFCIs and GFCIs or 2 poles that need the whole slot. I bet your drop is triplex 2ga and the PoCo rates that at 200a so all you would be replacing is the SE cable from the drop to the panel ... and maybe the meter can. My PoCo (FPL) gave me the meter can for free YMMV. They also cut off the SE and reconnected it top the new SE for free. I only had to buy the 20 feet or so of SE to get to the panel.
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So Haller, you're finally getting around to replacing YOUR fire hazard FPE panel are you. Well, you can't swap a 200 amp main breaker for a 100 amp, simply because it won't fit, but you can do what gfretwell recommends, or simply spend a few more bucks and do the complete service
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actyually my FPE was replaced near a year ago. my buddy looked to answers from me since I had been thru this, but wanted to DIY the project.
he basically wired his home and did a good job, but doesnt want to bother with permits etc
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On Tue, 27 May 2008 14:44:17 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Without bringing up the "insurance" boogie man I can still give you the real reason for a permit. Unless your PoCo has a great sense of humor they won't hook up your new SE cable without one, or even reseal the meter if you pull it. I hope you are not planning to work the SE conductors hot.
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On May 27, 10:12�pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have pulled a few meters in the past, the power company doesnt care as long as they are informed immediately. the fellow thinking of this is a volunteer fireman, trained to pull meters. he wants to avoid fighting a fire at his home:(
did it to remove broken off fuse.....
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On Wed, 28 May 2008 03:27:32 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

That still leaves you with the question of how you replace the SE from the meter can to the service point.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In our city (Houston), you tell the power company you want to temporarily remove the meter. Their standard is six hours from the call to have a worker remove the seal (and probably record the reading). You pull the meter at your convenience. When you get everything back in order, call the power company again. This time, they'll re-seal the meter (and probably take another reading) within 24 hours.
This is the sequence I've been through twice in the past couple of years.
Sorry about your town.
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actyually my FPE was replaced near a year ago. my buddy looked to answers from me since I had been thru this, but wanted to DIY the project.
he basically wired his home and did a good job, but doesnt want to bother with permits etc
Could you please explain the logic behind wiring a home and changing the service, but not wanting to get the work inspected. I don't understand the reasoning behind this. As a contractor I welcome inspections because they reaffirm that my work was done properly and should an issue of liability arise in the future I have evidence that an independent party found my work to be safe and compliant.
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John, you missed the point. It was inspected and found to be "a good job" by Hallerb

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a customers husband was cutting down a tree, and dropped a 15KVA line onto a local 120 volt line, fried 16 grand of electronic devices.
insurance pid the entire bill but added a exclusion so it cant happen again......
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

So every dog gets one free bite?
--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
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My mistake, Roy. I guess I need to pay more attention. LOL
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He might not need to swap out the 200 amp main breaker. When we moved into our house about 5 years ago I wanted to replace the 100A Federal Pacific panel. I checked with the city (I could do the work, but a permit was required) about the maximum size I could replace it with and was told that the service could handle 200A without changing the wires from the pole to the house. I only had to replace the meter base (the city provided the new meter and base with the $30 permit fee), and the service entrance wires that came down the side of the house (about 15 feet). This was on a house built around 1969, with overhead wiring coming to the house.
I ended up replacing the panel with a 200A Square D "Q0" series with 40 spaces. It was physically much larger, but fortunately I was able mount it slightly higher on the wall and all the internal circuits were able to reach to the top breakers in the panel, so I didn't have to extend anything.
Mike O.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

May I suggest that your friend install the panel with a generator interlock kit with a one hundred ampere breaker installed as the generator breaker. Then until he decides to upgrade he can use the main as the generator breaker and the one hundred ampere breaker as the main. In this way he will have a generator interlock that allows her/him to use any circuit in the home that the generator he attaches to the main breaker can supply. This will give him the safety of a generator interlock to use in the event of a power outage and still have a main breaker sized to prevent overloading of the service conductors.
The reason that I make this suggestion is that changing out the main breaker in a factory assembled panel is not a job for the faint of heart or the inexperienced. If it is badly done the panel can experience a "Burn Down" which is the term of art used to describe destructive arcing.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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