1_What amount of CO2 Carbon Dioxide is reasonable in the home to maintain good health

Yes carbon dioxide, not carbon monoxide, and where can I buy a sensor?
As a veteran confined to my home, I have time to think and act only in my small corner of the world. Since I am in my home almost 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, I would like to maximize the health I have. I exercise and get fresh air outside my back door, but as it gets cold, I spend much more time inside. So the subject line is my question and how do I monitor it.
I ask because this month when the furnace 1st kicked on I had to have a repair person deal with a carbon monoxide issue, so now I have 3 carbon monoxide detectors, 1 in the furnace roon, 1 in my bedroom and one in the main room of the house.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You'd have to have an incredibly airtight house for CO2 to become a problem. You are probably the best detector. If you are breathing extreemely hard without feeling like you are getting air, maybe CO2 is the problem - but probably not. If you are really worried, open a window.
Bob
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1,000 ppm of carbon dioxide inside is a good target. Outside air would be between 300 and 400 ppm. A CO2 sensor may be as much as $500. A simple thing to do is just leave a bathroom exhaust fan on all day and leave a window somewhere else in the house open an inch or 2. ron charlottesville va
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1_Patriotic_Guy wrote:

Well about all I can think of would be to use one of the sensors from a flue less gas heater some how. It will be set for about the right value and could be set up to provide you with an alarm. I have never seen a home alarm for CO² .
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Carbon dioxide should not be a problem. The level of 1000 ppm for buildings is more of a marker of poor ventilation and not a hazard in itself. Both submarines and spaceships keep the CO2 below 5000 ppm (0.5%). The greatest danger in a tightly sealed building is poor combustion due to reduction of oxygen which causes production of carbon monoxide. Since you have got that covered you should be ok.

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
None You dont want any at all. If you feel like you dont want to breath anymore and your head gets to spinning even if you are taking over 300 breaths per minute, while your heart is pumping at a rate of 10 or more beats per second, you got too much CO2 in the house and you are going to die within a few minutes. When you get to that level, all you can do is call 911 and pray that they arrive in time. Sometimes it might even be better to stop breathing since the effort of breathing is burning up your energy faster than if you did not breath at all. Either way, it's pretty much over when you get to this level, and you may as well climb into your death bed. If you go back a few weeks, there was a discussion about death beds, and everyone should have bought one by now. The other option would be to go to a hospital now. That way you will be under medical care when it happens. One other option would be to marry a doctor. Doctor wives are always good to have around in case your heart stops. They just prescribe a little sex and you are back in business in no time.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.