overseeding dilemma

I planted an annual ryegrass last Fall on my Atlanta lawn for temporary winter coverage (the lawn was dirt & weeds before), which came up nicely, and was told that I'd have to overseed w/a more permanent grass in the Spring, which I'm about to do today, as the ryegrass would not survive the summer. The problem is that the ryegrass grows very fast and I'm afraid it will be 6 inches high before the new grass (Scott's new blend of tall fescue & heat tolerant Kentucky Bluegrass) has begun to germinate properly. I've mowed it pretty short to compensate for this but think it will probably need at least one more mowing before the new grass has even begun to germinate. Am afraid this will damage the new seedlings. Should I mow anyway when the rye gets high enough? Or should I wait until the new seedlings are the recommended 3" high or so (by which time the rye may be towering)?
W.D.
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"W.D." <wdanis at NO SPAM yahoo dot com> wrote:

You'll have to cut it regularly. We do it all the time with our slice seed jobs without trouble.
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Thanks, Steveo -- will do

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W.D. wrote:

I wouldn't worry about the rye, it will die first hot week.
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As will seedling fescue, unless the original poster has a fair amount of shade, good soil, and is willing to water the heck out of it. Installing a fescue lawn in Atlanta during the spring isn't for the faint of heart.
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