Maintenance on #3

Warmed the #3 snowblower (old Wards) up, drained the oil and filled with fresh 10-30. Dropped the belly-pan and freed up the drive wheel slide. Squirted some oil on linkage / joints and buttoned it back up. Consider this case closed.
BTW, the ID plate says it's a GIL - 476B which my search indicated was built for Wards by Gilson in 1971.
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Srgnt Billko wrote:

Hi...
Slightly changing the subject if I may... some of you folks seem to be interested in and enjoying older products...
Should anyone care, I still have and occasionally use a Sears Craftsman C944.52929 blower... 22" single, 6 hp Tecumseh. Still works like a charm, original with the exception of a slight modification to the motor mount slots to compensate for the no longer available fractional inch sized drive belt. With 5w30 synthetic starts easily in -40 degree weather.
The good part is I still have the original manual, dated 6/1/79, so if anyone needs it I'll be happy to scan it for them. (I doubt Sears will care, given the age)
Take care.
Ken
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Original mauals are a real neat thing to have. I get ecstatic when I buy an old machine that comes with a book or two. I'm surprised about the "synthetic" - some of these old babies ask for non-detergent.
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Srgnt Billko wrote:

Hi...
Just for the heck of it I read it... makes no mention of detergency. It does want 10w-30 above 32 degrees f; either 5w-20 or 10 above 0 degrees f, and suggests sae 10 diluted with 10% kerosene below 0 degrees f :) Winterpeg (Winnipeg, Canada) often sees minus 40 degrees, so...
I chose to use the synthetic, because it sure does start more easily. In fact even though I'm getting long in the tooth I can still start it manually at those temps :)
As an aside, I saw someone (you?) mentioning drenching the chute with motor oil, and wondered if anyone else here has tried the "pam" trick. If I'm preaching to the choir I apologize, but an inexpensive spray can of pam (for those in other countries, the spray vegetable oil can that you might spray on a pan or in a pot to make it less likely for food to stick)
If you'll spray a little all around your machine (the auger, the frame that surrounds the auger, the chute, the chute controls, etc) before you start it makes a world of difference in how your machine operates. Nothing sticks, nothing freezes.
Buy the cheapest generic can - you're not going to eat it so what does it matter how good it might taste? :)
Take care.
Ken
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Spring chicken basted in wd40.
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wrote:

What did we do before the spray cans of that stuff ?
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Dunno but I buy it by the gallon can for refills in my spray bottles.
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built
questions on your Gilson......i found this site a few years ago when i was shopping for a snowblower.
http://home.gwi.net/~spectrum/snowblower.html
lots of good stuff there i hope it helps a little.
mike...........
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