end of season lawn question

Hello. I live in Ottawa Canada, my grass being a fescue/bluegrass/rye mix. Around labour day, I fertilized using a fall lawn care product with weed control, as I was still having some weed problems (this seemed to work, by the way). I aerated around the 21st of September, and the lawn actually has looked best in the last month or so. I had intended to put down one more application of fertilizer (wintercare) in late October (perhaps next weekend) without weed control to prepare the lawn for the winter and next spring. Since its getting down to the wire now, and the grass probably only needs one more cutting, my question is this: Is using the wintercare still a good idea at this point? (Temperatures here are unusually low for this time of year, we are already hovering just above 0c) Also, when I do cut the grass that one last time, how short should I cut it, and should I bag it or mulch?
Thanks SO much...
Jimmy
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you know that if you cut too much at once you shock that grass plants which damages that plants and promotes disease, right? And you now if you put too much fertilizer down, you will burn the plants, right?
Just let it be and and do your normal mowing . Normal mowing means mow when the grass gets tall enough to mow but not too much as to cut more then 1/3 of the blades...
The Commish wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@mthis.edu wrote:

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turf has readily available nutrient in the spring, as well as promoting good root depth. It also allows you to use less nitrogen in the spring, so you'll have less surge growth, and disease potential then.
As far as cutting, try to get it as short as possible before the snow covers it up. This will help prevent snow mold next spring by preventing long blades from laying over and compacting under the snow. I start lowering the blade now (still cutting in Ohio), and end up with it at about an inch on my final cutting.
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Thanks Steveo! I thought that cutting it shorter would help in the spring, but I wasn't sure. And it was someone in this newsgroup that suggested some time ago that I fertilize once in very early fall, and then again in very late fall...
was 'diespammer' suggesting that I never use fertilizer?
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Good luck.

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I was just suggesting that you not risk burning the lawn.
and I wouldnt' listen to stevoboy since he can't seem to keep any lawn green... LMAO
Just killfile the moron, and and help the newsgroup rid of his mindless chatter. Someone should have pour bleech in his gene pool long time ago.
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snipped-for-privacy@mthis.edu wrote:

does annually, clueless?

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Stevo is right and diespammer hasn't a clue Jimmy. After 12 years in the business and a few turf management courses behind me I know what I'm talking about.
There is one caution I'd throw your way though. This late fall fertilization is not without some risks. The U of Guelph recommends it, but I have seen problems on occasion. When the conditions are right that late fert can stimulate the grass to grow during the winter, underneath the snow, which can lead to disease of the turf. I cut the ferts off at the end of September and then I don't have to worry about it. One thing is certain though, if you do get the late fert down and don't have a problem w/ it you'll have the first green lawn on the street in the springtime.
Peter H
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A "lawn care expert" that I talked to when I had problems with sod I had bought said to cut short in the winter to reduce disease problems, and long in the summer to shade the soil. Of course, I am in Seattle - a considerably different climate.
Bob
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Yeah, that's pretty much what I'd heard....thanks
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I apply my second fall fertilizer about this time every year here in NJ. I keep mowing into Dec and my lawn is a deep green most of the winter, only going a little off color in late Jan or Feb. In the spring it greens up awesome.
One of my neighbors lawn already looks like crap. It's Zoysia, but that's another story.
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