Dual-Chamber PVC Necessary?


I have a Payne Plus 90 high-efficiency furnace. It has two PCV pipes coming out the side that go up through the roof. The exhaust pipe looks normal on the outside but inside it has two chambers: the larger on top for exhaust air and much smaller on the bottom to handle the condensate (water) that drips back down the vertical pipe.
I need to replace that short section of pipe connecting directly into the furnace. Is it Ok to use regular PVC or is the dual-chamber pipe that was installed when new 14-years ago still the way to go to have it function right. Thanks, Dan
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What did you local, competent, licensed, insured, professionally trained, HVAC technician tell you??
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HomeInSeattle had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/hvac/Re-Dual-Chamber-PVC-Necessary-34825-.htm :
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For $125 (or $135), they are more than willing to come out and look at it...
It's a really tough call: the technicians in the field see the results of the best and worst engineering and can often make things better than the original design. They can also make it worse.
On the other hand, the engineer who specified the dual-chamber pipe had to convince the company bean counters that the additional 70-cent cost per $950 furnace would not bankrupt the company, that it really was needed for best performance. Sometimes, however, engineers overengineer.
In this instance, does it cure a problem not likely to happen, or is the technician oblivious to any problem that doesn't instantly appear before their eyes?
By the way, the need to replace this pipe is based on the local, competent, licensed, insured, professionally trained HVAC technician half-gluing up 5 chunks of PVC and unions instead of one continuoou section and water pouring out of several of the joints and flooding the garage floor. It has reach the point of divorce court if I do not do something about all the leaks.
Thanks, Dan
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Then the installation wasn't done correctly, and the installer needs to correct the problem. It should have been caught by the mechanical inspector that checked the furnace and installation in the first place.
OTOH, if it was installed by the lowest bidder, then all bets are off.... you didn't get what you didn't pay for.
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HomeInSeattle wrote:

Not in our field. Engineers are saddled with competive costs analysis.

Again.. Not in our field. Many times we and our customers have to demand the extra's to make the equipment more viable.. The name of the game is cost cutting and still make a profit..Plus the stockholders demand an annual check.

Obvious that you are not happy with your present Service company. Check the yellow pages or call your local building Services Inspection department for a list of competent licensed and Bonded companies. You might even call for a reinspection of the last fellows installation job.
It has reach the point of divorce court if I do not do

Not a problem. In a divorce she will get the house with all of its leaks.

This really is not the Forum for complaints that should be handled in your own locale.

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HomeInSeattle had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/hvac/Re-Dual-Chamber-PVC-Necessary-34825-.htm :
-------------------------------------

For $125 (or $135), they are more than willing to come out and look at it...
It's a really tough call: the technicians in the field see the results of the best and worst engineering and can often make things better than the original design. They can also make it worse.
On the other hand, the engineer who specified the dual-chamber pipe had to convince the company bean counters that the additional 70-cent cost per $950 furnace would not bankrupt the company, that it really was needed for best performance. Sometimes, however, engineers overengineer.
In this instance, does it cure a problem not likely to happen, or is the technician oblivious to any problem that doesn't instantly appear before their eyes?
By the way, the need to replace this pipe is based on the local, competent, licensed, insured, professionally trained HVAC technician half-gluing up 5 chunks of PVC and unions instead of one continuoou section and water pouring out of several of the joints and flooding the garage floor. It has reach the point of divorce court if I do not do something about all the leaks.
Thanks, Dan
##-----------------------------------------------## Delivered via http://www.thestuccocompany.com/ Building Construction and Maintenance Forum Web and RSS access to your favorite newsgroup - alt.hvac - 26170 messages and counting! ##-----------------------------------------------##
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