What plants scare you the most and why ?

Page 1 of 2  
Even though you may admire still them, what plants (that you've either seen, or so far just read about) 'scare' you the most (however you define that) and please say why, for any one/s named ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 17:05:43 -0700, cyan999 wrote:

Heracleum lanatum http://ywgc.com/resources/faq/cowparsnip.html
--
Yard Works Gardening Co.
http://ywgc.com/resources.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Venus Fly Trap - definitely! Jeff Goldblum
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is the lesser known Pinus Fly Trap. Used to discourage things from urinating on your property. Make sure all zippers are closed before handling. It's not called the Lorena Bobbit plant for nothing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Desmodium gyrans. Because plants that dance are creepy.
http://www.kirjon.com/dancing_plant.htm http://www.yohea.com/dancing.shtml
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In my neighborhood of N.E. Los Angeles (Mt. Washington), the tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is rapdily encroaching on vacant hillsides on both sides of my property and attempting to invade my own garden, as well. Left unattended in a neighboring lot, this weedy tree has already created a little thicket of about a dozen trees now reaching over 30 feet tall.
The hillsides of Highland Park and Eagle Rock are spotted with these pesty plants and it's a nightmare to think what these rolling hills will look like 10 years from now if we don't somehow directly attack their progress.
The California Invasive Plant Council has listed this species as one of the Most Invasive Wildland Pest Plants and Widespread. Any suggestions on how to restrain or destroy these heavenly devils will be appreciated.
EWIRM: Know your weeds to control your weeds...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
raycruzer wrote:

Why don't you ask the California Invasive Plant Council what to do.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In the Southeast, kudzoo [Pueraria montana] can cover your house and trees if you don't fight it back.
Here in the Northeast and Oregon, the mile-a-minute plant [Polygonum perfoliatum] will cover you if you don't walk fast enough. In reality it will cover and kill other plants. It looks like a wild squash vine, really wild. It is called the kudzoo of the Northeast.
Some bamboo is known to grow at a rate of 91 cm per day. It is more fun than watching grass grow.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stephen Henning wrote:

Bamboo is a grass.
--

Travis in Shoreline Washington

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
raycruzer said:

<snip>
Cut them down and swab the stump with brush killer. Even then, be on the lookout for sprouts from distant roots.
This plant aggressively resprouts from any bit of root. And I've had apparently dead stumps send up shoots after a whole year of inactivity (however impossible that seems, I swear it happened).
The seedlings grow deceptively slowly the first year. All their energy seems to go to producing a massive root system.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks to Pat and Travis for your suggestions. You have given me the motivation to communicate with local neighborhood groups to deal with the tree of heaven in an organized fashion.
Yesterday I also noticed a number of these trees growing in the freeway landscaping near downtown Los Angeles. I spotted over 100 young A.altissimas in only one quarter mile stretch of the freeway. CalTrans also needs to take notice of this rapid infestation of the tree of heaven.
_____ Talk about weeds: World of Weeds www.ergonica.com Nature makes plants, humans make weeds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@post.com wrote:

I'm scared of poison ivy for the obvious reasons. And giant hogweed just frightens the bejeebus out of me. (Heracleum mantegazzianum)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get a life, both of you. Normal people are not scared or frightened of plants.
Janet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In North Florida, the common version of smilax (greenbriar) is a nasty thorny thing that will swing 20 feet across a path through long-leaf pine forest to snag the unwary walker with fierce scratches along bare arms and legs. Throughout the Northwest and inland west, knapweed, a particularly ugly centaurea (plants related to bachelor buttons) appears to spread into every bare patch of earth, and eventually shoves asides all attractive and hardy natives to make way for its ugly gray-green leaves and spiny dull-purple flowers. I own an empty lot on the outskirts of town, and I fear inspecting it to see the extent to which knapweed has taken it over.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I was staying with people who live in the redwoods, I was always worried outside because the poison ivy was just EVERYwhere. There's nothing worse than nettles where I live, & it's possible to get revenge on nettles by frying them up with potatos &amp eating them, so there's never any leeriness walkikng in the woods around PUget Sound. It was a strange feeling in the redwoods to be worried about a plant.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
Get your Paghat the Ratgirl T-Shirt here:
http://www.paghat.com/giftshop.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (paghat) wrote:

Along the Snake River in Hell's Canyon, on the Oregon side there is a plant that sounds exactly like a rattle snake when you walk through it. I was with a forest service crew that was taken in to a fire by boat at night. We had to hike from the river up to the fire at night while it sounded like we were surrounded by rattle snakes. What made it worse was that on the way in at dusk we had seen a diamond back rattler that stretched all the way across a dirt road. He was BIG.
The plant may have been Perilla frutescens or Rattlesnake weed. After blooming from July to October, they leave their calyx on the spike to cover the seed pod, shake the dry seed stalks and it rattles like a rattlesnake. Perilla is often confused with purple Basil and used for the same purposes.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Perilla frutescens is an Old World species. Are you saying native Americans somehow got this plant from China to wrap ther sushi in it? Its introduction into the New World flora as a weed was long after Columbus arrived.
I doubt it. Guess again.
There are a number of native American perennial legumes that have rattle-box seed pods.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am not native American, I didn't eat it, and this happened well into the Columbian period after Scots broom had taken over the west.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net says...

from the upper canopies of redwoods were known as "widow-makers" for a reason :-).
--
BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the advice, Chicken Little!!!!
Be thankful there are no elephant birds and that the ones that did once exist couldn't fly!!!
says...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.