Tree Has Reddish "Golf Balls" Somethings Appearing: What Are They ?

Hi,
Live outside of Boston.
Have this tree in my front yard about 20 feet tall or so. Have no idea what it is. Has pointed leaves, no cones.
Moved in about 4 yrs ago, and tree was like, well, just there since, and looking pretty.
Just now, WOW !
Zillions of round, reddish color, balls have appeared all over for the first time (at least in 4 yrs.). About 1 to 1.5 inches in diameter.
Surface is not smooth, has many protrusions going outward. Almost like a small golf ball, with the dimples going outward rather than inward.
Any idea what this is, and what is happening ?
Thanks, Bob
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"Robert11" wrote:

Would help a lot to know what type of tree and a photo would help immeasurably... sounds like it could be "galls", but could also be the tree's natural fruit/seed, however odd to fruit this time of year in the northeast
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Robert11 wrote:

The first thing that came to mind was American Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua). It has five-pointed leaves that almost resemble a star as drawn by a child. The fruit is golf-ball sized but has spikes rather than simple protrusions but what you are seeing might, I suppose, be early-stage fruits before the spikes fully develop. Does it look anything like this?
http://www.nps.gov/archive/gewa/Sweetgum.jpg
In theory this tree isn't native as far north as Boston but there is no telling what someone might have planted in a yard. There are also some other varieties of sweetgum that might qualify but I don't have any experience with them.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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First thing that comes to mind is Cornus kousa.
Dee
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-september.org:

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cornus_kousa_fruit.jpg
I second your nomination. All in favor ???
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wrote:
in

Looks like Dogwood fruit, each about the size of a pea, not 1-1.5" in diameter.
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According to Wikipedia, the fruit is 2-3 cm in diameter though can be up to 4 cm.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornus_kousa
Dee
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the description of the fruit sounds like dogwood (& those are edible, BTW), but would you describe the leaves as "pointy"? lee
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I wouldn't, no. But I could see how someone who didn't know much about plants might do so. A simple leaf with a point on the end might be described as pointy :-) But I guess if the OP doesn't post back with a response or a photo we may never know for sure.
Dee
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Reading this thread, I thought I'd snap some photos of my own pointy-leaved tree with red golf balls: http://www.tfrog.com/digitals/daily/daily.htm
The golf balls do not appear annually, which may be why it comes as a surprise to the OP, and mine are between 1/2" to an 1". They also mostly appear only on the side of the tree exposed to sunlight.
dwight
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Nice photos Dwight. Cornus kousa.
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dogwood (cornus kousa). those fruits are edible. the outer 'shells' are a bit crunchy which contrasts with the custardy insides. we had a bumper crop last year, but the fruits are quite sparse this year. they tend to bear heavily on alternate years, but this spring was cold and very wet here, so there was a shortage of bugs to pollinate as well. the trees appreciate sun, & fruit better if they get a lot of sun. the one next to my driveway always has more fruit than the ones in the semishade in the backyard. i have to fight both the chickens & the dogs to get any of the fruit... i discovered my cattledog will climb trees to get cornus kousa fruit last year. lee
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Thanks for posting your photos, dwight. I enjoyed perusing through them.
Dee
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Dee;864888 Wrote: > "dwight" snipped-for-privacy@XTFrog.com wrote in

Hi Folks, Most intrigued by your discussion, from where I am in Cornwall UK. I would also opt for Cornus but the variety I would go for is capitata.
Regards Lanerman.
--
lannerman


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wrote:

Yes, it could be Cornus capitata since one of its common names is "Himalaya strawberry-tree."
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Or maybe 'Litchi Chinensis'?
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Litchi_chinensis_fruits.JPG
Jon
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Litchi is sub tropical, I seriously doubt it will grow in the Boston area.
http://www.lycheesonline.com/lycheedescription.cfm
Until the OP posts a photo of the tree and growths described all anyone can offer is wild speculation. There are galls that also match the description and are likely to occur on trees that grow in the Boston growing zone. http://stockindexonline.com/index.php?q=keyword_search&edtKeyword=oak%20leaf%20gall&rdbKeyword=1&section=keywordsearch
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T2B wrote:
in

I saw something very much like this a day ago. Growing in poor soil on a slope leading into a lake in 7a (N Georgia). Sprawling, perhaps wider than tall. The fruit looked to be no bigger than am inch at most.
Jeff

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'Robert11[_2_ Wrote: > ;864396']Hi,

> and

> first

> than

Try Arbutus unedo [The strawberry tree].
--
beccabunga


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beccabunga wrote:

I'm voting with the others for Cornus kousa. I used to see them all over the place on Long Island which has similar growing conditions. Too cold for them where I live now <pout>
--
Sylvia

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