Transplanting Bamboo

Hello All:
I came across a patch of bamboo growing randomly in an area of woodland around my farm. I dont know how random it actually is, I imagine it had to be brought there somehow many years ago, but it is growing quite well along a stream bank.
I have since then contacted the landowner and received permission to take as much of it as I want.
What I would like to know is the best way to transplant it. I want to take about ten plants and start them to grow at my place. I have always loved bamboo.
The area that they are located at is very remote and only accessable by foot or horseback. I found them while riding my horse - that said, I would not be able to bring any kind of towing equipment or trailer or anything like that. Can I cut the plant down, remove a section of the roots, wrap them up good in wet burlap and transport them in that way? Would the root survive if I was to dig enough of it out and still cut the above ground section?
Any advise on this would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you, Pete
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On 3/23/2008 7:23 PM, Pete wrote:

Wait until you see shoots starting to emerge from the ground. Cut the older canes. Dig down to the root mass. You might need an ax to cut out a section. Be sure the section includes new shoots. Dig, cut, and handle carefully so that new shoots don't break off. You don't need many roots because bamboo is a grass, which will send out new roots. While bamboo generally likes lots of moisture, don't drown it while it is getting established.
Be careful. Some bamboos are "running". They can be exceptionally invasive. I've seen recommendations to plant bamboo in bottomless containers that are about two feet high, sunk into the ground with about two inches above ground. I've also seen bamboo escape from such planting arrangements.
Other bamboos are "clumping". They spread slowly and are easy to control. Then there are bamboo-like giant reeds (Arundo donax), an imported pest; in California, large amounts of money and effort are being expended to eradicate this. You might want to take a cane to an expert for identification before planting.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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The above is a recipe for failure, the worst time to divide or transplant is during the period when new shoots emerge.
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The above is a recipe for failure, the worst time to divide or transplant is during the period when new shoots emerge.
Just more inane, pontificating blather by the self professed expert David E. Roth.
Val
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