Ticks?

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Hi
I was in my garden the other day and come across a tick, I was 100% sure it was a tick and when I checked online I was 110% sure lol
But now its put my g/f off letting our son in our garden, I need to do something that will kill any bugs like that etc.
does any one know what I can do?
Thank you
--
MadKad


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On Wed, 10 Jun 2009 17:20:51 +0100, MadKad

I got several tick bites. The ticks come from the deer. DEET helps, but you still need to get naked in front of a mirror and look for any strange dots. Some ticks are very tiny but get bigger as they fill with blood. I remove them by slowly pulling them out, then apply hydrocortizone until the itching stops. It helps to keep the garden as tidy as possible too. Some birds enjoy eating ticks.
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MadKad wrote:

clothing, tight fitting around hands and feet. Most important to me is taking a shower afterwards or at least once a day. I spend a lot of time in the woods in the fall hunting and have seen deer ticks on my clothes. Lots of my friends have contacted Lymes disease but not me. Study here a couple of years ago showed practically all deer to have deer ticks and maybe half the ticks carried Lymes disease. Deer ticks are said to feed and drop off and most the time you do not even know it. Often bullseye rash is a sign of Lymes disease. Don't think its carried by the much larger dog ticks.
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DEET should NOT be used on children. a DEET free insect repellent should help, but keeping the grass short & the child away from shrubs & tall plants (where ticks are likely to hang out) is usually sufficient. there's no reason to keep a child out of the garden because you found a bug. if you have cats or dogs, get them on a spot treatment for fleas & ticks, like Advantage or Frontline. you might get chickens. they eat ticks.

all tick species can carry Lyme disease. only a third of the cases get the "characteristic" bull's eye rash (and spreading rashes could have another cause. my son got cellulitis from a deerfly bite last summer). lee
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wrote:

Ticks are prevalent on short grass, too, or can be carried into the house by dogs and cats, even treated ones. Ask me how I know.
And since not only deer and mice, but chipmunks and shrews can carry Lyme, it always pays to be cautious in any are where Lyme is known to be a factor (or any other tick-borne disease, as a matter of fact).
The best preventive of complications, since nothing is 100% effective at preventing tick bites, is to do a thorough body check after the child or adult comes in from the yard or outdoor activity.

This is not true. Dog ticks do not carry Lyme. And some types of ticks can carry, but are not documented as being able to transmit.
http://www.path.sunysb.edu/labsvs/tickpics/TICKpic.htm

In areas where Lyme is rife, the common practice if there is a tick bite from an unidentified tick is 24 prophylactic treatment with tetracycline. Better safe.
Boron
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This is insane. If you have a bulls eye then see a doc.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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: Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am. 2007 Mar;19(1):27-38. Links
Rickettsial and other tick-borne infections. Flicek BF. Internal Medicine of Newton County, 4181 Hospital Drive NE, Suite 404, Covington, GA 30014, USA. snipped-for-privacy@vanderbilt.edu
Tick bites are best prevented by people avoiding tick-infested areas.
When this is not possible, tick bites may be prevented by the wearing of long trousers that are tucked into boots. The best method to avoid tick bites is twofold: application of a topical deet (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) repellent to exposed skin, and treatment of clothing with permethrin. This system is currently used by the US Army to protect soldiers. Ticks can crawl underneath clothing and bite untreated portions of the body; therefore, treating clothing is imperative. Permethrin is nontoxic to humans, and can be used in any age group. Permethrin is commercially available. Checking clothing regularly while in tick-infested areas is highly recommended to back up the few hours of protection provided by the insect repellents. It is also recommended that the entire body be carefully screened for ticks and other parasites by campers and hunters while they are staying in and after leaving infested areas. Any tick found should be removed immediately. Removing ticks may not be easy. It is best to use blunt, rounded forceps, and a magnifying glass to remove ticks, especially when immature ticks are found. The forceps are used to grasp the mouthparts of the tick as close as possible to the skin, and then the tick is pulled upward, perpendicular to the skin, with a continuous and steady action. Usually any mouth parts of the tick retained in the skin are eliminated uneventfully by the body. Other methods of removing ticks, such as using fingers, lighted cigarettes, petroleum jelly, or suntan oil, should be avoided. Killing the tick in situ may increase the risk of regurgitation by the tick and the transmission of infectious agents. Most stick bites are uncomplicated, and result only in benign cutaneous inflammatory reactions that may be pruritic for a few days. As a result of mouthparts being retained at the feeding site, a granuloma may rarely develop. There are no data to indicate that antimicrobial prophylaxsis is beneficial to the tick-bitten patient to prevent disease. It must be kept in mind that the risk of transmission of disease increases with the duration of attachment and generally requires greater than 24 to 48 hours. The degree of tick engorgement or the time since tick exposure and discovery of the tick may be used to establish the likely duration of attachment and the risk of disease transmission. Reducing and controlling tick populations is difficult. Habitat modifications, including vegetation management by cutting, burning, and herbicide treatment, and drainage of wet areas are one strategy for tick control, but their effects are often short-lived, and they can cause severe ecologic damage. Chemicals used to control ticks may cause environmental contamination, and therefore, toxicity for humans and animals. Biologic control methods for ticks include the promotion of natural predators. Natural predators of ticks are beetles, spiders, and ants, and parasites such as insects, mites and nematodes. Tick control is best based on the concept of integrated pest management, in which different control methods are adapted to one area or against one tick species with due consideration to their environmental effects. Tick-borne diseases are increasing in prevalence. Perhaps it is because people are undertaking more outdoor activities, which result in contact with ticks and their pathogens. Clinicians should be aware of the clinical sign of tick-transmitted diseases, because morbidity and mortality as a result of these diseases increases substantially if there are delays in diagnosis and treatment. Tick-borne illness occur in distinctive geographic areas. The reporting of these illnesses and diseases to the health department enables the gathering of information and statistics. The public should be informed about the risks of disease in tick-infested areas and the means of preventing infections. The most common diseases are caused by Rickettsia, Borrelia, and Ehrichia, but with continued study, new pathogens and diseases will continue to emerge. PMID: 17338947 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
........... Bill who has had 4 deer tick and 6 regular ticks so far this spring. Sucks but I dislike chiggers more. Spouse had Lymes in about 1975 before it was named. Bell's palsy ...nasty.
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On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 10:53:51 -0400, Bill who putters

Since up to 40% of Lyme infections leave no tell-tale bull's eye, that's dicey. And fewer that one in ten produce a classic bull's eye rash. And stats show that only about 30% of those diagnosed with Lyme even recall a rash. And the rash may not appear for a week or two. And you need to add in those who are darker skinned and on whom the rash would be difficult to discern and don't forget those who get their rash in a place that isn't easy to see, such as the scalp or...shall I go on?
Get a clue, sweetie. Try reading the *whole* post for content, instead of freaking out about mention of a 24 dose of antibiotics.
Boron
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Don't go outside stay indoors. You will die in time but most likely of boredom.
Sweetie-pie Bill
--
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On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 15:45:48 -0400, Bill who putters

What would be the purpose of that? I have no trouble going outside where the ticks are. They don't scare me and neither does a prescription for tetracycline if I am at risk of Lyme.
And the last time I was biten by a tick, it hitched a ride indoors on a dog and I never even had to venture outside at all to get it to fall in blood-love with me.
I know how to check for and even remove all by my itty-bitty girly self, any ticks that attach themselves to me or mine. And also have the presence of mind to identify the obvious ones, and yet preserve them and take them to be identified if I cannot.
It doesn't take a genius to deal with the critters out of doors. IT takes knowledge and proper precautions. However, it takes an idiot who endangers oneself rather than take a prophylactic dosage of antibiotic for 24 hours when evidence points to the possibility that one has been bitten by a Lyme-bearing tick.

What's your problem with a doctor prescribing an antibiotic, Honey Lamb? There are an awful lot of gullible people around here who seem to swallow most anything that gets jabbered about on any unsubstantiated blog, so surely you can swallow some medical advice.
Boron
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Honey lamb , sweetie strange in deed.
Bill
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Your advice is sound. I once had a bullseye rash but doctor said it was a chigger bite in a rash area caused by something else He prescribed antibiotic as well as a Lymes test. When I asked him why the test and antibiotic since he was sure it was a chigger, he just said that's the way they do it. Guess it was legal protection for him.
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Not everyone gets the bulls eye pattern or any rash. There are quit a few false negatives with the test. At least in dogs one of the first symptoms is painful joints. It is much better to treat any tick bite like an infection. Ingrid

on the council grounds of the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago
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Wish you would replace the B with an M.
Bill
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On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 16:22:19 -0400, Bill who putters

To please you, who seems full of BM?
Go on, smartass, disprove anything I posted, if you think you're so frikkin' smart. If you can't, then who's a moron, eh? I am posting facts here, not your sort of drivel opinion.
Boron
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MadKad wrote:

Insect repellant works to some extent. Long trousers tucked in your socks is good. Getting somebody to check you all over in the shower is better. With dogs (as well as a tick collar) I check them each night by the finger-crawl method in tick season. Works for people too. :-)
David
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ticks are really tough and hard to kill, even in a house where you can fog the place up good. outside, liek the guy says, deet repellant, long sleeves and pant legs, tuck them into your socks, etc. what a pain. then tick checks once you get inside, they wander around a while looking for a good place before they plug in. they like armpits, groins, etc. the problem is that the big ones are dog ticks, easy to see and don't carry many diseases. the little ones like the size of a period are deer ticks, carry lots of nasty diseases. besides lyme disease, which was once local to lyme, CT, you got your rocky mountain spotted fever, babesiosis, tularemia, etc.
and like the guy says, deet isn't the most benign of chemicals. for one thing, it's one of those universal solvents, it doesn't just stay on your skin, it penetrates tissue very efficiently, and can carry other chemicals with it.
anyway, besides deer, note that deer tick are carried by mice, voles, etc. and probably small birds for the earlier part of their life, so keeping them guys out of the lawn isn't a bad idea; move woodpiles away from near the house, eliminate other little hidey holes, let the cats have the run of the yard at night. of course, then the cats carry toxiplasmosis..... face it, nature just sees us as food for microorganisms.
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MadKad wrote:

gets collars on the wee beasties...
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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DEET is a horrible chemical, I'd rather have the ticks than that crap. Don't use it on a kid, and if you do insist, put it on your clothes, and not your skin.
Check yourself when you come in. I've had rocky mountain spotted fever, and as long as you treat it within 2 weeks with antibiotics the fatality rate is 3%. If untreated, it's more like 30%.
The poster that said half the ticks carry bacteria is wrong. It's 1%, actually, and North Carolina is the top state for it (that's where I live). I get bitten by at least 1 tick a year (and have since I was old enough to play in the woods), and the first/only time I've gotten sick was when I was 30.
If you get bitten by a tick, or if you have flu-like symptoms during tick season, go to your doctor, and they can do a blood test. If they know what they are doing, they will start you on antibiotics right away, and cancel it if the test comes back negative. A rash is common if you get infected, but you can get sick and not have a rash.
Educate yourself, and don't make the kid paranoid about something so rare, there are better things to give him a complex about.
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/submenus/sub_lyme.htm
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I don't think I'm wrong but could not find the study done a few years ago but did find this good site:
http://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dph/epi/lyme.html
NC is a nasty state and I know of two people contacting Rocky Mountain spotted fever there.
Combine this with a poisonous snakes like copperheads, it's dangerous to go outdoors there ;)
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