Street tree advice

I would like to plant a tree on the sidewalk grass strip in front of my house that will eventually grow into a tall, graceful shade tree (no fruit trees, please). The strip is less than 5 feet wide, but I have seen some pretty big trees growing in strips that size in the area. I would like to avoid trees with shallow, invasive roots (my perennial garden is less than 10 feet away), and would be looking for one that has beautiful fall color. I live in Providence, Rhode Island (zone 5), and the location faces south. I don't mind slow growers, because I see this as a tree for future generations, and I would like my garden to get some more sun in the near future.
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Alison wrote:

Around here I'd have to get permission from the City to plant a tree in the parking strip and they might not let me plant ANYTHING there (parking strips are City property). If it were mine I'd kill that stupid 40-year-old 15-foot tall scraggy magnolia tree and put in a jacaranda, but they'd probably put me in jail for that.
I've never seen a more beautiful tree back east than the oaks and maples. Could something be better than those?
--
Ch rs,
B v
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Try these reccommendations: http://town.huntington.ny.us/permit_pics/121.pdf
MINOR TREES [Use under utility lines and in 3’ tree-lawns (the area between the curb and sidewalk) 1 ½” to 3” in caliper, 30’ apart] .. Acer campestre – Hedge Maple .. Acer ginnala – Amur Maple .. Acer buergerinaum – Trident Maple .. Carpinus betululus – European Hornbean .. Viburnum prunifolium – Black-haw Viburnum .. Koeleuteria paniculata – Golden raintree .. Prunus virginiana – Shubert Cherry .. Prunus sargentii – Sargent Cherry .. Amelanchier arborea – Service Berry .. Magnolia galaxy – Galaxy Magnolia .. Pyrus calleryana – Aristocrat, Cleveland Select, Redspire .. Syringa reticulata – Japanese Tree Lilac MAJOR TREES 2 ½” to 3” caliper spaced 40’ to 50’ apart .. Quercus borealis – Red Oak .. Quercus phellos – Willow Oak .. Quercus imbricaria – Shingle Oak .. Quercus acutissima – Sawtooth Oak .. Fraxinus pennsyvanica – Green Oak .. Tilia Cordata – Littleleaf Linden .. Tiliatomentosa – Silver Linden .. Ginkgo biloba – Ginkgo (fruitless cultivars) .. Celtis Occidentalis – Kackberry .. Gleditsia Triacanthos – Honey Locust .. Gymnocladus dioicus – Kentucky Coffetree .. Acer rubrum – Red Maple .. Sophcra Japonica – Pagodatree .. Zelkova Serrata – Zelkova .. Ulmus parvifolia – Chinese Elm .. Eucommia ulmoides – Hardy Rubber Tree .. Nyssa sylvatica - Blackgum • If sidewalk exists, tree must be planted between the curb and the sidewalk, 2 feet behind the face of the curb. • If no sidewalk exists, tree must be planted 5 feet behind the face of the curb. • For increasing diversity and minimizing the spread of disease, several species of trees should be used, installed on an alternating basis. town.
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Alison wrote:

The reason you should contact your city is that cities usually have lists of recommended trees. These lists are based on what will thrive in your climate and in the confined space between the sidewalk and curb. The lists are also based on what will not invade sewer lines, lift sidewalks, or drip on parked cars.
For your situation, I strongly recommend a diciduous tree that will allow winter sun on your house but shade it in the summer. A slow grower is good because they generally live longer.
--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/
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wrote:

I agree with this advice. My city went through a major tree-cutting operation several years ago after they did sidewalk repair/renovation. A good part of the repair was necessary because of very large old trees heaving up the concrete. The recent hurricane brought down trees of many species, so I would (now) be concerned about a tree that might grow tall enough to span a lawn and fall on a house. The "official" street tree here is crape myrtle, and while many of *those* were downed, they aren't enoumously heavy (or tall, usually) and their canopy is fluffy and light. Alas, not hardy in RI, I assume. Providence should have a list that will help you select.
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Alison wrote:

I don't know how it would fit, but now that they have disease-resistant elms, it would be nice to have them lining streets again.
I have both a Bloodgood Japanese maple and a kousa dogwood within planting beds, so neither has a destructive root system, and they both have great color.
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be looking for one that has beautiful fall color
'Autumn Blaze' Maple Northern Red Oak 'Autumn Purple' American Ash (Fraxinus americana) 'Marshall's seedliss' (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) 'Shingle' Oak 'Shumar's' Oak 'Armstrong' red maple (Acer rubrum) sed5555
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HI Alison,
I think I read that the most heavily planted street or boulevard tree in the US is the Red Oak-- Quercus rubra. It's an outstanding candidate for the growing conditions you're describing. As to their growth, Dirr writes:
"Red Oak can grow 2' per year over a 10 year period in moist, well-drained soil; however, in Wichita, KS tests averaged 11.5" per year over a 9 year period."
Red oaks provide abundant shade and are also pollution and soil-compaction tolerant-- they of course provide a great source of food for local wildlife. During their juvenile and more mature growth they exhibit grace, although they do gain a certain massive gravitas later in life.
Tilia cordata, the Littleleaf Linden, is also a great choice and is not as widely planted.
Dave

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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (Alison) wrote in message

Male Ginko
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