Strawberries!

First of the season showed up two weeks ago!
More proof of you-know-what.
Last June, I put in a whole bunch of plants, but got zip fruit, though that's supposed to be their season in this latitude (34 N.) Gritted my teeth, took good care of them; hoped for next June.
Whaddya know, mid-March, they're taking off!
HB
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Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

:)
...

if you planted them in June that is too late for them to flower and put on fruit for the same month, but i have had plants put on flowers and fruit while still in the pots and even survive the transplanting as long as the roots are not too disturbed and the watering is kept up. usually i remove all but one flower/fruit if i'm transplanting and they do ok.

i've had first flowers anywhere from March 11 to the end of June. are your plants flowering now or showing signs of waking up from dormancy?
this year i've only checked the plants so far and they are doing well because they had full snow cover the whole season. nice and green. eventually i will have to peel back the thin layer of pine needles once the weather actually warms up to where it isn't freezing overnight.
songbird
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On Monday, March 30, 2015 at 9:38:54 AM UTC-7, songbird wrote:

Yeah, I was too lazybusy to get plants in sooner...my bad...but I'm sill disappointed that good-sized plants, properly transplanted from nursery pots, should have just settled in comfortably but produced zip fruit.
o e but i have had plants put on flowers and

Plants are beginning to flower; a few already bearing fruit.
I don't understand about "dormancy". AFAIK, this happens in colder climates. T/F? Mine is "Mediterranean" --So. Calif coastal, with mild temps; no frost*. So would dormancy actually be a factor?

* by contrast with David Ross, who is not on the Coast but just over the mountain in the San Fernando Valley. ISTR they do get frost sometimes.
HB
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Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

they may have already flowered and had the flowers and fruits removed by the time you bought them. for one crop varieties (often called june bearing plants in N.A.) once that phase is past you won't see a new round of flowers until the next season.
...

ah, good to hear. :) seeing any bees/flies on them?

i know for the varieties i have here that it is temperature and moisture that determine when they'll start to bloom and not day length. after that it is the variety and moisture which determines if the plant blooms again or not up until the temperatures get too cold again.
songbird
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On Tuesday, March 31, 2015 at 9:36:40 AM UTC-7, songbird wrote:

Songie, the plants I put in last year were not (all? didn't keep good track) June-bearing. I usually try to put in varieties that will bear longer.
Right now, I need to stop dithering (my specialty!) and put in more fraises du bois. I kept 5-6 plants going since last year, but want to add to them. Taste SO exquisite -- but you need to look carefully; those shy little beauties try to hide <g>
HB
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Once upon a time on usenet snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: [snipped]

I used to pick those in the woods in England as a child - beautiful tasting things, always seemed nicer than the big meaty things you'd grow yourself or buy in the shops.
--
Shaun.

"Humans will have advanced a long, long, way when religious belief has a
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On Tuesday, April 7, 2015 at 4:15:20 AM UTC-7, ~misfit~ wrote:

Yeah!
I just spent time on-line looking for a local-ish vendor in So.Cal coastal. Anybody have a clue? Would rather not order bare-root w/shipping charges if I can find live plants.
David Ross in same general area -- any suggestions?
TIA
HB
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Once upon a time on usenet Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

I used to pick mine around Chedworth in the Cotswolds. There was a disused railway there and they grew along the side. However the best and most abundant were on and around the Roman villa there, back in the days when anyone could walk into the site and fossick.
As a curious child I occasionally found very large snails with white shells in the area and even, rarely, in the garden. However I couldn't find then in any of the available textbooks. A few years ago (and nearly a half-century later) I saw an article on the BBC site about this 'new' discovery in the area; An isolated population of large snails thought to be descended from snails that the Romans bought with them and 'farmed'. Hah! Where was the BBC when I was asking about them way back when? ;-)
--
Shaun.

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On Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 3:51:40 AM UTC-7, ~misfit~ wrote:

Love this stuff, Misfit! Keep it coming!
HB
"I never will, by any word or act, bow to the shrine of intolerance, or admit a right of inquiry into the religious opinions of others." - Thomas Jefferson, 1803
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