Sticky pots at Lowes

Today, as I was cutting through the garden center, as there is never a check out line there on weekdays, the announcement that all plants were 75% was made. Left with Huechera Miracle and a white eyes buddlia....for about $6
Cheryl
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so Cheryl, is that heuchera Miracle the one that is almost black leafed with sort of spots on the leaves? what are sticky pots? Eva Shovelful who is gardening in west Tennessee near the Mississippi river and the closest Lowe's is miles away.
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On 10/19/09 12:43 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@a21g2000yqc.googlegroups.com, "eva

Sticky pots are plants you have to have at the nursery or garden center - they just sort of stick to you through the check out.
Miracle has yellow with red spotted new growth that turn green as the season progresses. This got buried in the mostly shade area and we'll see how it does. For $2 rather than the original $12, I'll give it a try.
C
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THAT sounds awesome! I love Heuchera's myself. I have discovered that they like pots sometimes, but not all of them like shade. Some actually prefer sun or partial shade. Sticky pots, eh that sounds like a wonderful problem. LOL can't beat saving $10 on the plants, and what with finding that gasoline had risen in price by almost 30c overnight, I need all the financial help I can get. not going to go there. it smells of compost and politics, and I'd rather talk compost. we stumbled upon a Brown Turkey fig tree that was at Home Depot and because the rest of the plants they were offering had fruit on them, the one we picked was ignored. We got it for $8 whereas the rest were going for $16. Soon as we planted it, it dropped 3/4's of it's leaves that turned yellow. We went back and I paid attention to how the rest of the plants looked (the figs) and they were sheltered just in the inner portion of the outside nursery. I figured ours was just freaked out to be really out into the real weather. So I told my husband to wait and see. It's now doing fine, the remaining leaves are hanging in there until we get a frost, and I see little leaf budlets where next years leaves will come out. I can't want! I also have a few other shrubs I have brought with me that are already preparing for spring, so this will be fun to see how things unfold around our new home. Thanks for answering me Cheryl. eva
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Hi Cheryl and Eva I wish our Lowes's would have a 75% off sale, Maybe they never do that because we can plant just about any time of the year!
I am also a Heuchera fan. I have a bunch of them: H. micrantha, maxima, sanquinea.... the species that are native here then I have Rosada Wendy Canyon Duet Curly Red (Cultivars of the species ) also Plum Pudding, Amethyst Mist, Key Lime Pie, Creme Brulee, Saturn, Harvest Burgundy, and Hercules. One called Snow Angel (I think) didn't like it here and went to Heuchera heaven.
Now have you seen the Heucherellas? a hybrid of Heuchera and Tiarella. You've got to get started on those too, you know. I only have 4 of them...........Dayglow Pink, Pink Pearls, Quicksilver, Strike It Rich.
Love 'em all Emilie NorCal
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I adore Heucherella's. Not sure how they will do for me. I have one Tiarella, it's a bit late to go out and see what it is. I also dug up one out of hundred's of wild ones that were in the mountains where we went walking one day last year that lived quietly and behaved in a little six inch pot with it's native soil until I planted her in the shade bed I made for it and the Tiarella. I don't usually dig up wild flowers unless there are a lot of them. I am not greedy. I figured one was enough, and it's proven that I did it right. I can't wait to see how it does next springtime. I tucked it into raised soil on the northern side of the yard in dappled shade. I tend more to get things like wildflowers along side of the road where they are plentiful and I'm not messing with an eco-structure. Now if only I could locate some Chickory. but apparently I've not seen it here like it was everywhere in Eastern Tennessee. I may have to get seeds of it instead.
I also like sedums and succulents that are hardy (I've seen some huge pad cactus growing around the neighborhood here, and will beg a few pads when I get the courage up) to root for my own clump. I love the flowers and later the "pears". I don't think there are many plants or flowers I dislike actually. I know there are some. And since it's very moist and wet here, I will not be planting purple loose strife. I know better. I've seen acres of it, and it's beautiful and blooms all season until hard freeze, but I know that here it's way too wet and I've not seen it. I haven't seen another of my favorite wildflowers here at all, which surprised me. Joe Pye plant. (boneset or Eupatoria) there is Ironweed, and I've seen butterfly weed, and some tall daisy like plants which might be helianthus or heliopsis not sure until I look in the new book I got, but Joe Pye, not at all until I drive back east towards the middle of the state near Nashville, which I don't tend to do. I have seen huge area's of places with jewel weed which has those incredible orange flowers covering it. where you see it, there is always poison ivy, but it's a good remedy for poison ivy, and I love the knobby stems that it has. It reminds me of my grandmother's flowers she called Touch me not's. I'll be planting a few bulbs soon. I read that I could store them temporarily in the fridge, and that's where they are. but I'm at a loss as to how deep with them. According to White Flower Farm newsletter I get, they say to go eight inches deep on most bulbs. but the other books and nursery sites say three times the size of the bulb, which makes more sense. I have muscari and narcissus (Minnow and yellow cheerfullness, Thalia and Indian Hyacinth, or Cammassia) which luckily like sunny spots. I don't do tulips. I like them, but they don't come back after the first year and I'm a bit strapped for garden funds for now. Maybe some day I can get some of those botanical tulips that are guaranteed to come every year but are smaller. thanks for the great chat!
eva shovelful gardening a little bit in western tennessee near the Mississippi River zone 7b
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On 10/21/09 9:54 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@m20g2000vbp.googlegroups.com,

you can purchase the "old stock" very cheaply.

lots. I have a "snow" named one that is still doing fine.

Though I can easily water certain areas of it, I've mostly put the hostas there.
Cheryl
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oooh, but you can also plant this wonderful and easy to grow perennial called Epimedium that adores dry shade and is easy to grow, has beautiful flowers that look like minature columbine flowers and clumps up nicely. It also has gorgeous fall colors and heart shaped leaves. I have seen several kinds available at this nursery by the name of Plant Delights (the catalog itself is worth getting in the mail. Its hilarious and has some unusual plants. The prices seem a bit high but when you consider the quality of plant and the availability, it makes up for it. I have seen some of his hosta selections for less but not sure as to the size from the other nurseries.
I went outside and looked at what I have as well. I moved back in the spring and had everything in containers (that did quite nicely, in fact the Heuchera's thrived like they LIKE containers!). Here's what I have so far, and I don't think I will take them out of their holding containers until next spring regardless of the fact that this is perfect time for perennial planting. I need to prepare a bed for them first. Not an easy task. Considering I have really nice soil here (as compared to the clay that I had while I lived in east Tennessee) I have to eliminate the crabgrass first and prepare the bed better. I have several of these together in one pot which gives the pot a textured look and is rather nice. Here's what I have (I had no idea I had this many!) most of them were listed as Dolce, so I won't put that in front of every one. Key Lime pie, Creme de Menthe, Venus, Amethyst Mist, Encore, Creme Brulee, a small Peach Melba, Purple petticoats, Mystery that has spots on the very dark and rounded leaves, and Alabama Sunrise tiarella foam flower. I also have a very very dark leafed ajuga I can't seem to find the tag for in the pot it's planted in. Those leaves are almost black they're so purple. While I was outside doing the inventory of what I had, I had a thought, though. Why not plant some small pieces of Creeping Jenny between the Heuchera's to give a golden texture between the ruffles and textures of the leaves? One of the things I did notice with Lowe's is that their Creeping Jenny in their ground cover area are in little four inch pots that are around $1.40 each, and it wouldn't take but a few to tuck in among the Heuchera's. I'll have to save my change and get some as I've always seen Creeping Jenny at Lowe's most of the time. Maybe even find some reduced. And yes, I've asked several times a worker in the nursery department of Lowe's if they'd reduce a plant late in the season (this is how I managed to snap up some blooming shrubs I was desperate to find on my wish list). Home Depot doesn't do that as easily. Lowe's seems to have some sort of unwritten policy about their competition. I do know about the "busted bags of anything is 50% off" rule with Lowe's and asked about the ability for Depot to do the same, and got lucky once. That was it. After that when I was looking for decent bags of soil in broken or busted bags I was met with these "are you nuts, lady???" looks, so I let it go and decided to continue this practice where I knew it was store policy.
It's not raining yet, so I am going to take my few bags of bulbs outside and tuck them into a few areas, and before I can plant them into one bed, I have to remove crabgrass, so I will come back later. Thanks for the wonderful garden chatting. Eva Shovelful gardening in west Tennessee in zone 7b near the Mississippi River
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On 10/22/09 2:59 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@31g2000vbf.googlegroups.com, "eva
SNIP

would do so again

grower/hybridizer just south of me in MA that I might try and check out someday.
Cheryl
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