stawberries didn't produce

Planted some strawberry starts in a window box. The plants took off great we had a few strawberries initally but then they just stopped. That was about two months ago in late July. I kept them water well everyday and they have good soil they are planted in. Could they just be establishing themselves and we get the fruit next year?
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Maybe they would prefer to direct instead?
You expect a bumper crop of strawberries in a window box? Have you gone mad? Plant them in the ground instead if you expect a sizable crop of the fleshy receptacles.

we
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Can't plant them in the ground we have a horrible problem with moles and also have free range chickens. Tried them in the ground before and between the two they didn't last long.
Didn't expect a bumper crop just more then half a dozen.

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I do not know about the window box thing, should work if there is good soil in it I expect. After all, the strawberries don't know that they are in a window box as long as there is ample space for the roots.
However, the usual recommendation for a new strawberry patch is prevent a crop the first year by pinching off the blossoms. That way the plant and roots develop before fruiting the following year. Perhaps you expected too much for a first year planting?
If so, I would recommend that you pinch the blossoms off next year. Then you should get a good crop the following year.
JMHO
John
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On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 12:37:47 -0700, "Mogie"

I read the replies, including "have you gone mad" and your explanation of why you can't plant in the ground.
"Window box", on the face of it sounds a bit slight (not having seen the actual box).
If you plant in a container that is DEEP enough !!! and WIDE enough, you should be able to replicate ground conditions to a great extent. Make sure that your soil is very well conditioned, and I don't mean a bag of potting mix from a nursery. (I know you said "good soil") Use honest dirt, ameliorated with compost, worm castings, other good stuff. Plenty of sun, judicious watering.
Good luck! Don't give up. Early this year, I planted some Sequoias from the nursery that were on sale, had fruit on them. After that fruit ripened, they didn't do squat for months. I was about to pull them out when they rallied. Conjecture: They may have been hot-house; induced to bear before their time. When their season came, they produced.
--
Wesley Clark for President
www.DraftWesleyClark.com
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.ab.edu (J. Del Col) wrote in message

A cultivar is a variety or strain of a plant that does not occur in the wild. At least that's what the -- Concise Oxford Dictionary of Botany-- says. That's the -only- difference between it and a wild variety.
"Variety" has no special botanical meaning that would exclude cultivars. In fact, "variety" isn't even in the CODB.
If you can cite a source to back up your assertion, do it. Otherwise, you have made an empty distinction.
J. Del Col
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Its back to school for you, DelColonic.
Welcome to the basics of botanical nomenclature.
http://www.bgbm.org/iapt/nomenclature/code/SaintLouis/0001ICSLContents.htm
Here's what your CODB forgot to include.
http://www.bgbm.org/iapt/nomenclature/code/SaintLouis/0008Ch1Art004.htm

same
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So exactly what is the botanical difference between a cultivar and a natural variety?
If you can't demonstrate that, then your distinction between the two is empty.
J. Del Col
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Alright DelColon, you arrogant retard, since you were obviously playing hooky that day smoking reefer instead of in your biology class with all the other students and you suffer permanent brain damage that severely limits you ability to understand certain basic concepts, I guess I will need to come out and explain it to you.
A botanical variety is a subspecific taxonomic ranking between that of subspecies and form. In order to be valid, the name of a botanical variety is given in Latin form and according to the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN). A botanical variety represents a subset within a species as a wild population of phenotypically similar plants that fall within the definition of a particular species and are more similar that a subset that would be considered a subspecies but not as similar as a subset that would be considered a form.
http://www.bgbm.org/iapt/nomenclature/code/SaintLouis/0000St.Luistitle.htm
A cultivar is a plant selected by man for its horticultural or agricultural merit. It may be a selection from a wild population, a mutation appearing in cultivation, a hybrid or a selection from a hybrid. A cultivar must be given a fancy name and the name has no botanical ranking.
http://www.ishs.org/sci/icracpco.htm
The two terms are mutually exclusive and in no way have the same meaning.

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Ah, a list of taxonomic categories, how original; I learned them back in high school. I also learned that they aren't nearly as neatly defined as you seem to think they are. You really ought to keep up on the war among the lumpers, splitters and redefiners in the taxonomic wilderness.
Yur citations are no support to your implication that there is a botanical difference between a cultivar (cultivated variety) and a natural variety.
Put up or shut up, bunky.
J. Del Col
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Read all my replies before shooting off your mouth and showing the depths of your ignorance, DelColon, you rectal polyp.
I've already explained it to you three times. I am not going to draw you a picture.
Since you refuse to actually read the citations and you are unable to understand their meaning or any other basic concepts, you show you are completely unworthy of any serious consideration and there is no reason to waste any more time on you.
You can go back to playing in the dirt in the dark. Be sure to have your mommy put on your protective helmet first so you don't hurt yourself.

http://www.bgbm.org/iapt/nomenclature/code/SaintLouis/0001ICSLContents.htm
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One more time, waxboy; demonstrate the botanical difference between a cultivar and a natural variation. You can't, and neither can anyone else. Botanists disagree on what a species is, yet you claim there's a solid definition of variety that distinguishes between natural varieties and cultivars. Your cliam is empty.
A cultivar is --by definition-- a kind of variety, a subset, so to speak. It's a difficult concept, but eventually even you may be able to grasp it.
All cultivars are varieties, but not all varieties are cultivars, comprende?
If you claim there's a botantical distinction that goes beyond that, prove it.
J. Del Col
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Alright DelColon, you arrogant retard, since you were obviously playing hooky that day smoking reefer instead of in your biology class with all the other students and you suffer permanent brain damage that severely limits you ability to understand certain basic concepts, I guess I will need to come out and explain it to you.
A botanical variety is a subspecific taxonomic ranking between that of subspecies and form. In order to be valid, the name of a botanical variety is given in Latin form and according to the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN). A botanical variety represents a subset within a species as a wild population of phenotypically similar plants that fall within the definition of a particular species and are more similar that a subset that would be considered a subspecies but not as similar as a subset that would be considered a form.
http://www.bgbm.org/iapt/nomenclature/code/SaintLouis/0000St.Luistitle.htm
A cultivar is a plant selected by man for its horticultural or agricultural merit. It may be a selection from a wild population, a mutation appearing in cultivation, a hybrid or a selection from a hybrid. A cultivar must be given a fancy name and the name has no botanical ranking.
http://www.ishs.org/sci/icracpco.htm
The two terms are mutually exclusive and in no way have the same meaning.

and
in
mean
you
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Name-calling seems to be your true, though meager, talent, waxboy.
Now listen carefully--
All cultivars are varieties, but not all varieties are cultivars. It's a difficult concept, but you may be able to grasp it.
In fact many cultivars, are natural mutations, so what exactly would the difference be between them and what you claim is the distinct category of a natural variety? You can't demonstrate it, and neither can anyone else.
If you -can- demonstrate a -botanical- difference between a cultivar and a natural variety, prove it. Otherwise, your claims about the distinction are so much wind.
J. Del Col
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Alright DelColon, you arrogant retard, since you were obviously playing hooky that day smoking reefer instead of in your biology class with all the other students and you suffer permanent brain damage that severely limits you ability to understand certain basic concepts, I guess I will need to come out and explain it to you.
A botanical variety is a subspecific taxonomic ranking between that of subspecies and form. In order to be valid, the name of a botanical variety is given in Latin form and according to the rules of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN). A botanical variety represents a subset within a species as a wild population of phenotypically similar plants that fall within the definition of a particular species and are more similar that a subset that would be considered a subspecies but not as similar as a subset that would be considered a form.
http://www.bgbm.org/iapt/nomenclature/code/SaintLouis/0000St.Luistitle.htm
A cultivar is a plant selected by man for its horticultural or agricultural merit. It may be a selection from a wild population, a mutation appearing in cultivation, a hybrid or a selection from a hybrid. A cultivar must be given a fancy name and the name has no botanical ranking.
http://www.ishs.org/sci/icracpco.htm
The two terms are mutually exclusive and in no way have the same meaning.

and
in
mean
you
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news:<qagcb.1805$Gv1> A botanical variety is a subspecific taxonomic ranking between that of

Yeah, just like a cultivar, binky.

And is therefore biologically indistinguishable from a natural variety.
You lose, binky.
Taxonomists have their rules; nature plays by different ones.
J. Del Col

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