SRM Mulch

We (my wife, as I said she was nuts) did an experiment with tomatoes and red SRM mulch this year and I am eating crow.
The plants in the mulch row are at least twice as big as the row planted in bare dirt... same plants only two feet away.
Anyone else have experience with this stuff?
js
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your experimental design is flawed. you needed to mulch the other with cypress or some other colored mulch as a control. bare dirt is not a proper control to the red mulch. Ingrid
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On Jun 12, 10:56?am, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

Bare dirt is the *only* proper scientific control against the red SRM mulch... the poster says right there, "bare dirt".
Really doesn't need a control, not when planted in the same soil, in very close proximity, and not when the result is so obviously such a great difference in plant size, size being the only result being tested. Using a single different mulch is not a scientific control, using no mulch is the only practical scientific control because all else being equal (which it is) that is precisely the only element for which the test is being conducted... arbitrarilly tossing in some other kind of mulch will only skew the test, because then you'd need to test the red SRM against every other known mulch... and since you're not the mulch goddess you can't choose which other mulch from the many thousands to employ... why not choose peanut shells, or buckwheat husks... you can't, the test is red against dirt. The test as described is to compare the red SRM against no mulch and is exactly what occured... *perfect science*. If after the test the "plants are at least twice as big" (not just perhaps borderline difference to argue about), then res ipsa loquitor, the scientific value of the test by its results speaks for itself. By your logic you're assuming that these gardeners regularly use some other mulch, but there is no such evidence, but there is evidence to the contrary... asssuming ones fantasy is not at all scientific. And if they do regualry use a different mulch then that one and that one only would be the only acceptible control in their case. In your world you can do as you please... perhaps in your world you shred your soiled red panties for mulch, perhaps you should run a control with your laundered red panties... but this is about their world, and in their world the only possible scientific control is *their* dirt.
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Oh lord, another one come down from the mountain with his clay tablets. Another turnip truck must have lost it's load. This ones got a real 'tude. Is it a full moon tonight?
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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if it is mulch vs bare dirt, correct.
if however it is RED mulch vs ?? the ?? needs to be some OTHER color of mulch. hell, it can even be shredded newspaper.
I think it is obvious that mulch will cool the soil and keep the soil moist much longer. no experiment is needed at all.
Ingrid

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On Jun 13, 10:35?am, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

Actually anything that impedes evaporation keeps the soil from cooling... evaporation is what cools soil, the more air circulation the more the soil cools. Most mulches (unless highly reflective and porous) act to keep soil warmer... dark mulches can kill plants by causing roots to literally cook. Personally I would never use that red plastic unlesss they come up with a porous/woven version... air and water must be able to freely penetrate for any mulch to be worthwhile... I don't consider any plastic sheeting a mulch, regardless of color.
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Most mulches (unless highly reflective and

tomatoes are never mulched until the soil temp is high enough that it wont impede growth. and mulches are used to moderate soil temp, including keeping the soil cold under fruit trees in spring so they wont blossom out to soon. Ingrid
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On Jun 14, 11:41?am, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

You not but a few hours ago claimed you reside on the Alaskan tundra... and grow fruit trees there.

It's scientifically impossible for mulch to cool soil, mulch (any mulch) can only act to warm soil. Mulch absorbs radiant energy from the sun, transfers heat energy directly to the soil, and insulates to retain heat... when soil temperatures become too warm then it's best to remove mulch and/or shade the area from direct sunlight with some sort of suspended light diffuser, such as opaque plastic sheeting that permits lots of aeration. Mulch does not add shade... any mulch suspended above the soil is no longer mulch, then it becomes a parasol. I've now concluded that you are not any kind of dr., perhaps of bs.
Btw, tomatoes do not grow during daylight, tomatoes are in the nightshade family, they absorb energy during daylight and only grow at night time. Tomato plants of any age love hot days and hot nights... tomatoes don't do well when nights are cool.
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Sheldon, what chew smokin' boy? The good doctor said," Up here in the frozen tundra". Sheldon, get a grip. But don't worry, when the sun comes up in the west tomorrow, everything will be alright.

use alphalfa which be more of a light golden hue when it dries out, don't cha know? Now while it be true that besides suppressing weeds, it also reduces water 'vaporation, in part by keepin' the soil cool. Damp ground be dark colored, don't cha know. Dry ground be light colored (at least it is in my garden) don't cha know. So if'in you leave dark ground exposed to the Sun, it heats up and the ground loses water (PV=nrT). In my garden, when the soil heats up, I mulch.
Look on the bright side. Maybe you be good at cards.
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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In article

Hmm. Mr Attention Deficit Disorder didn't answer my question. He's obviously just a "know nothing sniper who pot-shots but who can't suggest something better... proves absolutely you know zero".
"I can appreciate humor as well as the next person but unless you along with your comedy offer a viable alternative than all you are is a know nothing envious douchebag."
And such poor composition and misspelling too.
- Billy Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
P.S. You can have your petard back now.
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plonk..........
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Soil is not dirt?
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I've got it out there for the first time, and didn't plant a 'control' plot, so I'll just have to wait and see. My main objective is to cut down on early blight.
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