Spring flower id please, think they are wild

I only hit this group when I need something, but would greatly appreciate knowing what this is as I took a bunch of photos of them this morning growing on a hillside right in town. They must spread fast and easily as I noticed there were a ton of them in the yard across the street. This is the midwest we are talking about.
http://www.white-peacock.com/Blue1.jpg
Almost forgot the link.
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They look like scilla.
Jacqui
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axeman wrote:

I agree. Damn things are spreading like wild fire in part of Palos Park (IL).
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Scilla. I'll look that up. They're quite attractive to me. Thanks again!

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Just talked to a bud in Palos Park and he said that the plants die back within a month of flowering so your lawn doesn't look like crap for months. Of course he less than a dozen of the plants on his property. He said someone down the street has an acre full of them.
The question is do you want to plant something that may be so invasive it may spread throughout your neighbors property?
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I already have thistles because I let one grow because I wanted to photograph it :-). I live on a corner, and most of the neighbors have lawn care. I would like some on my terrace because it is eroding but I really should have it terraced first, and I would rather not have rr ties but nice limestone and . . . a quarter block of that is $$$.
Since I got the answer I looked it up, and you have to plant the bulbs 2 to 3 in deep and one place was out of stock and the other place had a fancier variety. I prefer this one. Maybe I could dig some of those bulbs in the fall if I ask the property owners.
I will probably not plant any, but I might. Then I could plant a wildflower mixture with it which might take over when those died back. Today I just wanted to know what it was because it looked so pretty with that hill all in bloom. It's on kind of an ugly woodsy street, but the photos look like I could have tramped deep in the woods. Closest thing we have to the Texas bluebonnet (no comparison). We have chicory along the roads during the summer, somebody id'ed that for me here.
The last plant I had id'ed here I found growing wild in a field and they got into a flame war over it, not that but I think things had been heating up before I came on the scene but is was lycoris squagimera or resurrection lily or painted lady. Sure was beautiful.

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When I have planted scilla I have done it in the fall. If you decide you want to put some bulbs in, wait for your fall bulb catalogues and order some then.
Jacqui

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Will do. I ordered 50 daffodil bulbs late last fall and didn't get down to the farm where I wanted them to plant them. They are still in my fridge. I don't know if they will be any good by fall or not. I have two bulb planters somehow, but if the ground isn't soft, it is almost too hard for me. Maybe I can have the hardware store sharpen them a bit. I fear they are going to be ruined if I can't find help. I'll worry about it in the fall. Scilla bulbs are smaller, so a heavy old knife might do for that; they look like they can push up through almost anything which is good. I can't dig and prepare beds properly like I used to be able to do.
Thanks for all the helpful comments.

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Just wondering if the fridge is is the same one for your food stuffs? The chance that some guest could cook a few daffodils by mistake exists.
VERY toxic!
I'd hill them until you are ready to plant.
Bill
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Actually, if you put them in the bin with oranges, the bulbs won't live once planted. There is something about the acidity of the oranges that messes up bulbs.
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No they are in like onion bags inside the cardboard box they were mailed in on the shelf, and I seldom buy oranges, just a lemon when I cook fish.

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I never have guests, especially ones that cook.

I kind of thought they might be.

Too bad I can't plant them now as the ground is very soft. Hill them. I guess that means dump them in a shallowish hole with good drainage and cover them with dirt. I will try to do that if they still seem viable, but not because I'm worried about anybody eating them. They are taking up too much room in the fridge.

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Yup
I do this when ever I get too much to do AKA plant.
Bill
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