Replacing methyl bromide

This article describes an Israeli enterprise that sends grafted vegetable seedlings all over the world. The objective is to avoid/ replace the use of harmful methyl bromide.
http://www.jpost.com/Sci-Tech/Article.aspx?id (5757
HB
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I've never even heard of methyl bromide!
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On 9/23/12 6:05 PM, Farm1 wrote:

It is used extensively as an agricultural soil fumigant, especially just prior to planting strawberries.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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wrote:

It's used, ostensibly, to kill nematodes, but, basically, destroys the soil ecology, and the ozone layer. It is used in vineyards (prior to planting), and strawberry fields here in California. Its use is driven by quarterly profits.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methyl_bromide> Bromomethane is readily photolyzed in the atmosphere to release elemental bromine, which is far more destructive to stratospheric ozone than chlorine. As such, it is subject to phase-out requirements of the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Ozone Depleting Substances.
--
Welcome to the New America.
<
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg

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It seems to me that if a little tiny country -- admittedly a world leader in technology -- can figure out a way to do without this awful stuff, that our big rich country should be ashamed to be eft behind.
Unfortunately, the occupants of the best little whorehouse in Washington -- aka the U.S. Congress -- do the bidding of their corporate masters; the public be damned.
At the Wikipedia site Billy posted, all becomes clear:
==============================
In the United States bromomethane is regulated as a pesticide under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA; 7 U.S.C. 136 et seq.) and as a hazardous substance under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA; 42 U.S.C. 6901 et seq.), and is subject to reporting requirements under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA; 42 U.S.C. 11001 et seq.). The U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA; 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.). A 1998 amendment (P.L. 105-178, Title VI) conformed the Clean Air Act phase out date with that of the Montreal Protocol.[11][12]
*******Whereas the Montreal Protocol has severely restricted the use of bromomethane internationally, the United States has successfully lobbied for critical-use exemptions. ******* In 2004, over 7 million pounds of bromomethane were applied to California. Applications include tomato, strawberry, and ornamental shrub growers, and fumigation of ham/pork products. Also exempt is the treatment of solid wood packaging (forklift pallets, crates, bracing), and the packaged goods, being exported to ISPM 15 countries(to include Canada in 2012).
Same old, same old...
HB
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It seems to me that if a little tiny country -- admittedly a world leader in technology -- can figure out a way to do without this awful stuff, that our big rich country should be ashamed to be eft behind.
Unfortunately, the occupants of the best little whorehouse in Washington -- aka the U.S. Congress -- do the bidding of their corporate masters; the public be damned.
At the Wikipedia site Billy posted, all becomes clear:
============================= In the United States bromomethane is regulated as a pesticide under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA; 7 U.S.C. 136 et seq.) and as a hazardous substance under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA; 42 U.S.C. 6901 et seq.), and is subject to reporting requirements under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA; 42 U.S.C. 11001 et seq.). The U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA; 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.). A 1998 amendment (P.L. 105-178, Title VI) conformed the Clean Air Act phase out date with that of the Montreal Protocol.[11][12]
*******Whereas the Montreal Protocol has severely restricted the use of bromomethane internationally, the United States has successfully lobbied for critical-use exemptions. ******* In 2004, over 7 million pounds of bromomethane were applied to California. Applications include tomato, strawberry, and ornamental shrub growers, and fumigation of ham/pork products. Also exempt is the treatment of solid wood packaging (forklift pallets, crates, bracing), and the packaged goods, being exported to ISPM 15 countries(to include Canada in 2012).
Same old, same old... ______________________________________ Nasty stuff for the poor old planet.
I've just done a search on it's use here and it seems that although the use as an ag. product is becoming lower over time, as a chemical used as part of our Quarantine, it could be a lot lower if we weren't quite so fussy.
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Higgs Boson wrote: ...

====
the public is also the representatives... if you insist on making it an "us or them" kind of situation then you get the results of a multi-class system (rulers and peons).
if nobody speaks up loud enough then they go with what the lobbyists push down their throats.
if people want change they have to speak up, show up and keep expressing interest.
songbird
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Du sprichts aus meinem Leben, Songbird.
AKA, dass 'raht, pipple does havtah do wha you sez...
But they is too dam iggerant 'n lazy tah even try!
HB
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'Farm1[_4_ Wrote:

Methyl bromide, used to disinfect soil before planting strawberries, which is 60 times damaging the ozone layer then chloroflurocarbons, which are banned in America. Methyl bromide is acutely toxic, exposure to high concentrations can cause damage to the respiratory and central nervous systems even cause death. The United States is responsible for about 40 percent of the 72,000 tons of methyl bromide used worldwide every year, with California alone producing 80 percent of the nations berries and 20 percent of the global market 1.5 billion pounds yearly. Farmers credit methyl bromide along with the mild, coastal climate (their fields are four times more productive than any other state) for their $750 million crop.
--
allen73

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$781 million in Monterey County alone in 2110. California is trying to replace it with methyl iodide which is marginally better - or worse - depending on who you want to believe
--

09=IX

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