Red mulberries?


A book I have says that the unripe fruit and sap from the leaves is "hallucenogenic" and causes stomach upset. Is this true? I have a year-old "accidental" red mulberry growing in the back yard and one of my dogs "plays" by snatching leaves or grass blades and running from me. I'm worried the tree would harm her if she got hold of the problem parts.
Should I go ahead and remove the tree? I can't find any other mention of the toxicicity problem on the net.
Any and all help is much appreciated.
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With a one-year-old tree you do not have much invested in it. It would seem a good opportunity to replace it with something that you really want. I do not see much that is desirable about a mulberry. I do not know about hallucenogenic properties but if they were significant I would expect the matter to be noted in standard garden texts.
Dick

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Actually, I have *nothing* invested in it except the space it inhabits because some generous bird "planted" it there.....:)) The book was a "Toxic Plants & Mushrooms of North America" type of thing. [I had to buy it because of the pup's tendencies to stick everything in her mouth]
Ironically, I grew up with huge mulberry in my front yard and cheerfully played under it and in it, while also enjoying the berries with no problems. I never gnawed the leaves or any such thing so I have no idea if the "danger" is over-rated or not. Of course, pets, like kids, amplify your concerns about everything.....:)
Perhaps a trip to Lowes will turn up some deserving non-toxic tree that's needing a good home.
Thanks for your help, Dick.
Shari
wrote:<BR><BR>With a one-year-old tree you do not have much invested in it.&nbsp; It would <BR>seem a good opportunity to replace it with something that you really <BR>want.&nbsp; I do not see much that is desirable about a mulberry.&nbsp; I do not <BR>know about hallucenogenic properties but if they were significant I <BR>would expect the matter to be noted in standard garden texts.&nbsp; <BR><BR>Dick<BR><BR>&gt; A book I have says that the unripe fruit and sap from the leaves is <BR>&gt; "hallucenogenic" and causes stomach upset.<BR>&gt; Is this true?<BR>&gt; I have a year-old "accidental" red mulberry growing in the back yard and <BR>&gt; one of my dogs "plays" by snatching leaves or grass blades and running <BR>&gt; from me.<BR>&gt; I'm worried the tree would harm her if she got hold of the problem parts.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Should I go ahead and remove the tree?<BR>&gt; I can't find any other mention of the toxicicity problem on the net.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Any and all help is much appreciated.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt;</BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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