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Did you see the back cover of Tree Care Industry XIX, No3 -march 2008. SUPER thrive? They say it has hormones in it and it helps trees? trees do not have hormones. Hormones is an animal term. Trees have have growth regulators. Could some one explain how a hormone is going to help a tree? Its say the USDA said it helps trees above and below ground????? A hormone? I guess its the same guy from the USDA that keeps telling congress the way to better forest health is more logging and more roads. Are you sure, Don Staples, you don't have something to do with that?
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Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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No, I have nothing to do with it, but I am sure you are a complete dip shit.

You are not a forester, tree expert, arborist, or biologist, you are a fraud.
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On Tue, 25 Mar 2008 22:55:26 -0400, "symplastless"

Really? There are endless articles by qualified resources which disagree.
Hormone Interaction in Apical Dominance in Phaseolus vulgaris L. TIN SHEIN1 and D. I. JACKSON
Lincoln College Canterbury, New Zealand
Received: 9 December 1970
Gibberellic acid (GA3), kinetin, and indole-3yl-acetic acid (IAA) were applied to roots of Phaseolus vulgaris under two different light intensities and when either young or old leaves were removed In all cases GA3, promoted stem and lateral growth, especially when light intensity was reduced. Promotion by GA3, of stem growth under reduced light was reduced if IAA and kinetin were present; promotion of lateral growth under reduced light was reduced if IAA was added and eliminated if kinetin or kinetin plus IAA were added to GA3. Removal of young and mature leaves reduced main stem growth; removal of young leaves promoted, and of mature leaves reduced, lateral shoot growth. We suggest that shoot growth and apical dominance are governed by the balance of hormones present in elongating internodes. There may be two ways of modifying this balance; firstly by altering light, temperature, or nutrients, or by applying hormones generally to the plant. Secondly, local modifications can be made by removing apices or young leaves, or applying hormones in lanolin to specific areas. Knowledge of both the general and local conditions may be necessary for a complete understanding of apical dominance.
Physiologia Plantarum
Volume 90 Issue 1 Page 230-237, January 1994
To cite this article: Morris G. Cline (1994) The role of hormones in apical dominance. New approaches to an old problem in plant development Physiologia Plantarum 90 (1) , 230237 doi:10.1111/j.1399-3054.1994.tb02216.x Prev Article Next Article Abstract The role of hormones in apical dominance. New approaches to an old problem in plant development
* Morris G. Cline11Dept of Plant Biology, Ohio State Univ., 1735 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA.
* 1Dept of Plant Biology, Ohio State Univ., 1735 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA.
Abstract
The role of hormones in apical dominance has been under investigation with traditional spray and weigh methods for nearly 5 decades. Even though the precision of hormone content analyses in tissue has greatly improved in recent years, there have been no significant breakthroughs in our understanding of the action mechanism of this classical developmental response. Auxin appears to inhibit axillary bud outgrowth whereas cytokinins will often promote it. Conclusive evidence for a direct role of these or other hormones in apical dominance has not been forthcoming. However, promising new tools and approaches recently have begun to be utilized. The manipulation of endogenous hormone levels via the use of transgenic plants transformed with bacterial genes (iaaM and ipt from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and iaaL from Pseudomonas syringae pv. savastanoi) has demonstrated powerful effects of auxin and cytokinin on axillary bud outgrowth. Also, possible auxin and cytokinin involvement of rolB and C genes from Agrobacterium rhizogenes whose activity is associated with reduced apical dominance in dicotyledons has received considerable attention. The characterization of unique mRNAs and proteins in non-growing and growing lateral buds before and after apical dominance release is helping to lay the groundwork for the elucidation of signal transduction and cell cycle regulation in this response. The use of auxin-deficient, and auxin/ethylene-resistant mutants has provided another approach for analyzing the role of these hormones. The presumed eventual employment of molecular assay systems (SAUR/GH3 promoters fused with GUS reporter gene) which are presently being developed for analyzing auxin localized in lateral buds will hopefully provide a critical test for the direct auxin inhibition hypothesis. This article is cited by:
* Peizhen Yang, Jan Smalle, Sangsook Lee, Ning Yan, Thomas J. Emborg and Richard D. Vierstra. (2007) Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases 1 and 2 affect shoot architecture in Arabidopsis. The Plant Journal 51:3, 441457 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * Petra Stirnberg, Ian J. Furner and H. M. Ottoline Leyser. (2007) MAX2 participates in an SCF complex which acts locally at the node to suppress shoot branching. The Plant Journal 50:1, 8094 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * Katherine Bainbridge, Karim Sorefan, Sally Ward and Ottoline Leyser. (2005) Hormonally controlled expression of the Arabidopsis MAX4 shoot branching regulatory gene. The Plant Journal 44:4, 569580 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * Hitoshi Nakagawa, Chang-Jie Jiang, Hitoshi Sakakibara, Mikiko Kojima, Ichiro Honda, Hidetoshi Ajisaka, Takaaki Nishijima, Masaji Koshioka, Tamaki Homma, Lewis N. Mander and Hiroshi Takatsuji. (2005) Overexpression of a petunia zinc-finger gene alters cytokinin metabolism and plant forms. The Plant Journal 41:4, 512523 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * Suzanne Sanders, James B. McGraw. (2005) Harvest Recovery of Goldenseal, Hydrastis canadensis L. The American Midland Naturalist 153:1, 87 CrossRef * Wenxian Sun, Marcia J. Kieliszewski and Allan M. Showalter. (2004) Overexpression of tomato LeAGP-1 arabinogalactan-protein promotes lateral branching and hampers reproductive development. The Plant Journal 40:6, 870881 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * R. A. Wesselingh, and M. L. Arnold. (2003) A Top-Down Hierarchy in Fruit Set on Inflorescences in Iris fulva (Iridaceae). Plant Biology 5:6, 651660 Abstract Abstract and References Full Article PDF * Jean J. Pan and Keith Clay. (2002) Infection by the systemic fungus Epichlo glyceriae and clonal growth of its host grass Glyceria striata. Oikos 98:1, 3746 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * Chunjian Li, Heidrun Pfeffer, Frank Dannel, Volker Rmheld and Fritz Bangerth. (2001) Effects of boron starvation on boron compartmentation, and possibly hormone-mediated elongation growth and apical dominance of pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Physiologia Plantarum 111:2, 212219 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * Rosario Muleo, Stefano Morini, Salvatore Casano. (2001) Photoregulation of growth and branching of plum shoots: Physiological action of two photosystems. In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology - Plant 37:5, 609 CrossRef * Krisztina Nikovics, Julietta Simidjieva, Adrian Peres, Ferhan Ayaydin, Taras Pasternak, Jeffrey W. Davies, Margaret I. Boulton, Dnes Dudits, Gbor V. Horvth. (2001) Cell-Cycle, Phase-Specific Activation of Maize streak virus Promoters. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 14:5, 609 CrossRef * Chun-Jian Li & Fritz Bangerth. (1999) Autoinhibition of indoleacetic acid transport in the shoots of two-branched pea (Pisum sativum) plants and its relationship to correlative dominance. Physiologia Plantarum 106:4, 415420 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * Shona L. Batge, John J. Ross, James B. Reid. (1999) Abscisic acid levels in seeds of the gibberellin-deficient mutant lh-2 of pea (Pisum sativum). Physiologia Plantarum 105:3, 485490 Abstract Abstract and References Full Text Article Full Article PDF * Hao-Jie Chen, Marie Bollmark and Lennart Eliasson. (1996) Evidence that cytokinin controls bud size and branch form in Norway spruce. Physiologia Plantarum 98:3, 612618 Abstract Abstract and References Full Article PDF * A. NOVOPLANSKY. (1996) Hierarchy establishment among potentially similar buds. Plant, Cell & Environment 19:6, 781786 Abstract Abstract and References Full Article PDF * P. LEJEUNE & G. BERNIER. (1996) Effect of environment on the early steps of ear initiation in maize (Zea mays L.). Plant, Cell & Environment 19:2, 217224 Abstract Abstract and References Full Article PDF * C.-J. Li, E. Guevara, J. Herrera and F. Bangerth. (1995) Effect of apex excision and replacement by 1-naphthylacetic acid on cytokinin concentration and apical dominance in pea plants. Physiologia Plantarum 94:3, 465469 Abstract Abstract and References Full Article PDF
Marsilea drummondii A. Br Gilles Pilate, Lucienne Sossountzov and Emile Miginiac
Laboratoire de Physiologie vgtale, CNRS (UA 1180), T 53, 5me tage, Universit P. et M. Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France
Terminal buds and successively subjacent lateral buds of the water fern, Marsilea drummondii, were examined to determine the pattern of hormone distribution in relation to apical dominance. Quantitative levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA), zeatin and zeatin riboside (Z and ZR), and isopentenyladenosine (iPA) were determined by a solid-phase immunoassay using polycional antihormone antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used following a one-step HPLC purification procedure to obtain the free hormones. Active shoot apices contained the most IAA and Z-type cytokinins and inhibited buds the least. No significant differences in ABA levels were found leading to the conclusion that ABA did not play any role in apical dominance. The normal precedence of the most rapid outgrowth of the youngest inhibited bud as observed previously in decapitated plants was well correlated with its very high level of iPA observed in this study. The same phenomenon was observed in the median buds but with a weaker amplitude. The presence of this storage form could indicate that a bud at its entry into quiescence eventually looses the ability to hydroxylate iPA to Z-type cytokinins when it is fully inhibited. IAA and Z + ZR are concluded to be essential for lateral bud growth.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid 080131093800AA3CExo
www.rooting-hormones.com/apical.htm
http://www.mandops.co.uk/p3.htm
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What you are referring to is growth regulators.
Define a growth hormone in a tree.
Again trees do not have hormones.
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Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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The answer for ALL symptomless's idiotic posers is "where the sun don't shine."
-paghat the ratgirl
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visit my temperate gardening website:
http://www.paghat.com.html
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What a lack of knowledge.
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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What a maroon.
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On Thu, 27 Mar 2008 12:08:03 -0400, "symplastless"
Hey sir, I not only gave websites with correct and scientific information, I took the time to explain it. How come you didn't check?
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symplastless wrote:

Plant hormones are called auxins but calling them hormones must be OK because it was accepted as an answer on Jeopardy last night ;)
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