PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Poison Ivy

Page 2 of 2  
Cheryl Isaak wrote:

That's OK. I wish I could find some way to use the stuff. I could get rich. Seems like every tree has some. The timber was grazed many years ago and I think the only thing the cattle didn't eat was the ivy and gooseberries. I'm in a timber stand improvement program and I'm attempting to get rid of invasive non native species and any vines in the trees. I have lots of Virginia creeper too. It can actually kill a tree. So far I'm too far north for kudzu thank goodness.
gls858
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ann wrote:

Octagon, too. I use ammonia because it works even better. Diluted oven cleaner works well too.
Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 02 Oct 2007 11:31:40 -0400, Cheryl Isaak

I wish it would be fall around here. Still October and still 90 by day, 70s by night. I need serious weeding action.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I pull it and bag it to get rid of it. As long as I've got gloves on I don't have a problem. A vine that big, however, is something I wouldn't tangle with (pun intended <G>). I'd cut it off at the base, paint the cut surfaces with Brush Be Gone, and then leave it to die off. Even the dried leaves and branches can cause irritation, so gloves and long sleeves are needed to clean up the dead parts the following season.
Don't burn it! The oils will vaporize in the smoke, it can kill you to inhale it!
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not me, we don't have it in the UK

What a fascinating delight your website is; thanks for that
Janet
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 2 Oct 2007 18:46:54 +0100, Janet Baraclough

(snip)
Maybe not now, but it has been there.
Many years ago there was an article in "Pacific Horticulture" Magazine about people in England growing Poison Oak, or maybe Poison Ivy, as an ornamental plant.
Seemed kind of strange to me, I don't like the stuff myself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think that article must have meant rhus typhina, aka staghorn sumach. (note, this is not rhus vernix, your poison sumach).Rhus typhina is an extremely handsome ornamental tree
http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&q=rhus%20typhina&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi
quite commonly planted as a garden tree in the UK, but only because it poses very minimal risk of skin irritation. It's nowhere near as toxic as poison oak, poison ivy, or poison sumach. It's not the same plant as US poison ivy, though it is in the same family. (Anacardiaceae)
Janet
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting, that "caged animal at the zoo" theory. Maybe that's what the previous owner of our house was thinking, as we had a rather large poison ivy covered tree as well (unlike the photo, it was spreading into flowerbeds, along a fence, etc, as well as up the tree, though).
I cut off the vines around the tree and dug up the roots (with gloves, long sleeves, shower/laundry afterwards, etc). It would have been a big job with or without herbicide, I suspect, given the number of other plants around (some desirable).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.