OT: Bitten by a mole

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My cat and dog caught a mole on saturday, I heard the poor thing squealing so I ran over and tried to get it away from them, and it bit me on the finger. I have been reading that moles "hardly ever" carry rabies but the "hardly ever" worries me. Should I get the shot -- I am wondering if the doctor will just give it to me if I ask. I could not catch the mole and don't know what happened to it so it can't be tested... when it bit me I ran in the house to wash the bite wound. I'm thinking I should just get the shot but if moles are never vectors for rabies...
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Bob Provencher ICQ 881862
Aesir Software Programming Consultant/Contractor
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ran
I was bit by a mole last year. The buggars have sharp little teeth! Luckily, I was wearing leather gloves. But why are you asking here about this? I suggest you call your doctor for advice.
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Luckily,
Yeah it is a bit off topic. I garden quite a bit and lurk here, my thinking was that gardeners are likely to run into moles and if I heard that a lot of us have been bitten by the critters I wouldn't worry about it. Best bet is to call my doctor.
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Bob Provencher - ICQ 881862 - Internet, Graphics, Multimedia, Games
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I would definitely go to a clinic and ask them what the moles in your area are carrying. I was bitten by a squirrel once in the Grand Canyon... and there were posters all about stating that the squirrels were infected with some disease that takes 7 days to kill a person... well I got that disease, I can't remember the name of it, but it gives you diarrhea within 24 hours and your body starts to dehydrate itself... and I ended up going to the library to look through a medical book to find the treatment, and luckily I had some tetracycline available.
Definitely take a visit to an emergency room and tell them that you were bitten and ask them what kind of diseases they carry. Or do it proper and visit one of them $50.00 walk-in clinics.
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Jim Carlock
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I believe your cat and dog are more intelligent about the handling of moles.
Dick

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Bob Provencher wrote:

It would be a good idea to check with your family physician. However, here's typical advice on dealing with animal bites [Note: (1) "Rodents such as mice, rats, moles, gophers, chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are considered free of rabies." and (2) risk of other infection, e.g. , tetanus.]:
http://www.saintelizabethonline.com/body.cfm?id=259
Bites, Animal or Human Main Symptoms
Bite or claw wound from a pet or farm animal. Bite or claw wound from a wild animal. Bite from a human child or adult. Animal or human bites usually need to be seen because all of them are contaminated with saliva and prone to wound infection. Types of Animal Bites Bites from Rabies-Prone Wild Animals: Rabies is a fatal disease. Bites or scratches from a bat, skunk, raccoon, fox, coyote, or large wild animal are especially dangerous. These animals can transmit rabies even if they have no symptoms. Small Wild Animal Bites: Rodents such as mice, rats, moles, gophers, chipmunks, prairie dogs and rabbits fortunately are considered free of rabies. Squirrels rarely carry rabies, but have not transmitted it to humans. Large Pet Animal Bites: Most bites from pets are from dogs or cats. Bites from domestic animals such as horses can be handled using these guidelines. Dogs and cats are free of rabies in most metro areas, but stray animals are always at risk for rabies. Cats and dogs that are never allowed to roam freely outdoors are considered free of rabies. The main risk in pet bites is serious wound infection, not rabies. Cat bites become infected more often than dog bites. Claw wounds from cats are treated the same as bite wounds, since they are contaminated with saliva. Small Indoor Pet Animal Bites: Small indoor pets (gerbils, hamsters, guinea pigs, white mice, etc.) are at no risk for rabies. Puncture wounds from these small animals also don't need to be seen. They carry a small risk for wound infections. Human Bites: Most human bites occur during fights, especially in teenagers. Sometimes a fist is cut when it strikes a tooth. Human bites are more likely to become infected than animal bites. Many toddler bites are safe because they don't break the skin.
When to Call Your Doctor for Animal or Human Bite Call 911 Now (your child may need an ambulance) Major bleeding that can't be stopped. First Aid Advice: apply direct pressure to the entire wound with a clean cloth.
Call Your Doctor Now (night or day) If Your child looks or acts very sick. Bleeding won't stop with 10 minutes of direct pressure (continue pressure until seen). First Aid Advice: wash all the following wounds with warm water and soap before bringing your child in: Any contact with an animal at risk for RABIES. Any cut or injury from a wild animal. Any cut or injury from a pet animal (e.g., dog or cat) (EXCEPTION: superficial scratches that don't go through the skin or tiny puncture wound). Puncture wound (holes through skin) from cat (teeth or claws). Bite looks infected (redness or red streaks). Human bite that breaks the skin.
Call Your Doctor Within 24 Hours (between 9 and 4) If You think your child needs to be seen. Last tetanus shot more than 5 years ago. Bat contact or exposure without a bite mark.
Call Your Doctor During Weekday Office Hours If You have other questions or concerns.
Parent Care at Home PET ANIMAL BITE: tiny puncture wound or superficial scratches (EXCEPTION: cat puncture wound). HUMAN BITE that didn't break the skin.
Home Care Advice for All Animal Bites 1. Bleeding: For any bleeding, apply continuous pressure for 5 minutes. 2. Cleansing: Wash all wounds immediately with soap and water for 5 minutes. Also flush vigorously under a faucet for a few minutes (reason: can prevent many wound infections). Scrub the wound enough to make it re-bleed a little (reason: to help with cleaning out the wound). 3. Antibiotic ointment: Apply an antibiotic ointment to the bite 3 times a day for three days. 4. Pain Medicine: Give acetaminophen or ibuprofen for pain relief. 5. Expected Course: Most scratches, scrapes and other minor bites heal up fine in 3 to 5 days. 6. Call Your Doctor If: Wound begins to look infected (pus, redness, red streaks). Your child becomes worse or develops any of the "Call Your Doctor" symptoms.
Parent Care for Pediatric Symptoms. Copyright 2000-02. Barton D. Schmitt, MD, FAAP
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On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 22:42:18 -0500, Ermalina

[snip] I think it would be fair to apply some discount to the credibility of anyone who classifies moles as rodents.
Another opinion:
"There are no known diseases dangerous to humans at this time. Nevertheless, you should always were gloves when trapping them." (http://www.wildlifedamagecontrol.com/molecontrol.htm )
Tell your doctor and follow his advice. He will be more familiar with diseases carried by the local small animals than any of us will.
--
Chris Green


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http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mammal/rodentia/rodentia.html moles are rodents http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/health/g1259.htm#HANTAVIRUS if you are in the west there is Yersinia pestis aka the plague (treated with antibiotics) most commonly passed by chipmunks and squirrels in the south west there is Hantavirus. it isnt treated and is most commonly passed by mice dont know of any case of rabies passed by a rodent. OTOH, you may get an infection from the puncture wounds. so do see a physician if there is any tenderness. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
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On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 13:52:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote:

Good page-- as it points out; "Shrews, moles and hedgehogs are also not rodents; they are classified in the Insectivora.) "
The best people to ask would be local Dr's, vets & whatever the government 'Environmental Conservation' office is called in your locale.
Jim
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believe me, anything with the two big upper/lower teeth that constantly grow ARE RODENTS. I dont care what the genus and species are and somebody splitting hairs. It is animals with lots of sharp pointy teeth that can spread rabies. lots of people think bats are flying mice, but look at their mouth and there are those lots of those sharp pointy teeth. same with skunks, sharp pointy teeth. Moles = big upper and lower RODENT teeth Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
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wrote:

Citing amateurish websites for the full sum of one's scientific knowledge can also be a fun way to prove sasquatches not only exist, but are from Mars.
Insectivores like shrews, moles & hedgehogs are NOT rodents. Insectivores do NOT have "constantly growing" gnawing teeth. Rabbits & hares however do have gnawing teeth without being rodents; they are lagomorpha.
Trust me on this. And do consider suing your seventh grade science teacher.
-paghat the ratgirl

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"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote in

This confirms what I have always suspected. Elephants (loxodonta anyway) are really just giant mice, as are warthogs (teeth), hippopotami (teeth), cats (rabies) and dogs (rabies). Raccoons, formerly in order Carnivora with cats and dogs are now also Rodentia. There are some differences, but why split hairs?
How does one get bitten by a mole anyway? Was it a wealthy mole (who could afford glasses) and could see? Or did the mole, thinking it was about to be lunch, decide to have one last meal himself? ("Man that's one big ugly worm ... oh well, lunch is lunch ... goodbye cruel world!")
You know your life sucks when a cat and dog decide to make friends and gang up on you. But it can't be all that bad if you get away.
Score: moles 1 (subject to verification) computer programmers 0 cats 0 dogs 0
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Those animals do not have large constantly growing apposable incisors. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote in

The tusks of elephants[1] are really incisors that are constantly growing. Elephants don't have an opposing pair in the lower jaw, but their other teeth do keep growing (until they run out). The tusks of hippos and warthogs are really canines (which rodents, except for moles [2] under your definition, don't have), but why split hairs?
[1] http://elephant.elehost.com/About_Elephants/Anatomy/Dentition/dentition.htm l [2] http://www.skullsite.co.uk/Mole/mole.htm *
* Insectivora teeth are not supposed to be very differientiated, so [2] may not be representative
I could not find proof that elephants are really mice, but here is proof that cats are really mice (or that mice are really cats):
http://www.masatakas.com/hkmouse.html
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Ha, that's a darn good question. I've rescued quite a few rodents (mice) from the cat and dog since as long as they aren't in the house I have no problem with them. Generally, I'll grab a pair of gloves, grab the rodent and get the cat and dog away from it. In this case while trying to rescue the INSECTIVORA (mole) I had no access to gloves, the thing was squealing in pain, as far as I can tell the cat and dog where having a grand ole time, the dog having just pawed and stepped on it the cat batting it around a bit, so I wanted to get it away from them. It was obviously in pain and bit me as soon as I grabbed it.
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Bob Provencher - ICQ 881862 - Internet, Graphics, Multimedia, Games
Aesir Software Cog Interactive
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I once saved a bee from drowning, damn if it didn't turn around and sting me. :)
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Yesterday overcome by the mischief imp, I reached under a flower & folded the petals upward around a bee. It became perfectly still. When I let the petals fall back into place, the calm bee continued its gathering.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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I believe it simply comes down to the nature of the beast . . . much like the fable about the frog and scorpion.
LeeAnne

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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote in message
[snip]

You may be thinking of gophers or mole rats or voles or something else, but not *moles*.
Moles do not have incisors that are anything like rodent incisors. Some moles have canines that are large enough to annoy a larger animal. But all have insectivore dentition: small and spiky throughout. You can see a specimen of a mole skull at http://www.skullsite.co.uk/Mole/mole.htm
--
Chris Green

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absolutely correct. http://www.nsrl.ttu.edu/tmot1/ordinsec.htm VOLES are rodents, MOLES and SHREWS got the pointy teeth. I dont know where I got the picture in my head of big rodent teeth in connection with moles. and if you were one of my students you would get bocu bonus points for that. I hope I am never to old to learn new things or correct misinformation. Ingrid
snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net (Christopher Green) wrote:

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